peak expiratory flow rate


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peak expiratory flow rate

[¦pēk ik‚spī·rə‚tȯr·ē ′flō ‚rāt]
(medicine)
A measurement of the amount of air that leaves the lungs on forced exhalation. Abbreviated PEFR.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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This study was designed with the rationale to look for the impact of education of proper metered dose inhaler technique over peak expiratory flow rate among the patients of moderate persistent bronchial asthma.
Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR)-A simple ventilatory lung function test.
Minawi, "Comparison of peak expiratory flow rates applying European and Iranian equations to Palestinian students," Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal, vol.
These show that hand grip strength was positively correlated with BMI upper arm length mean arm circumference and peak expiratory flow rate and all these were statistically significant.
CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that particulate pollutants and metals such as manganese and lead in the particles are associated with a decrement of peak expiratory flow rate. These effects were robust even with consideration of genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase.
The increase in sputum clearance with the Mapleson C may be explained by previous laboratory studies which showed that the Mapleson C delivered higher peak expiratory flow rate, peak inspiratory pressure, and tidal volume (Savian et al 2005, Maxwell and Ellis 2003).
"Target" peak expiratory flow rates for children are calculated based on height and weight, and depict the "normal" or "expected" level of pulmonary function.
Abbreviations: PEFR = peak expiratory flow rate, QB = quiet breathing, Sp[O.sub.2] = partial pressure of oxygen, T = thoracic, US = ultrasound.
Then, resting heart rate (HR) was taken for 1 min; (3) blood pressure was then measured at the 15-min interval and averaged using a Mercury Sphygmomanometer by the auscultatory method; and (4) peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) was measured with a standard Peak Expiratory Flow Meter.
At 6 months, the two groups had roughly equivalent improvements in morning peak expiratory flow rate.
In this study, increases in ozone concentrations above 120 ppb were associated with an increase in respiratory symptoms and a decline in peak expiratory flow rate among children but with no change in respiratory symptoms or pulmonary function among camp workers.
During asthma screening at her school through this project, a 42% decrease was noted in her post-exercise peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR).