peak gust

peak gust

[′pēk ′gəst]
(meteorology)
After United States weather observing practice, the highest instantaneous wind speed recorded at a station during a specified period, usually the 24-hour observational day; therefore, a peak gust need not be a true gust of wind.
References in periodicals archive ?
The island of Kikaijima reported a peak gust of 42.
3 million customers lost power from winds she said gusted to 85 miles per hour, although most of us had wind like we did on Prospect Hill in Auburn, where our peak gust was 59 miles per hour.
The weather section at RAF Valley said their peak gust was 54mph at 4.
Akibare Ltd is a parametric securitization of Japan typhoon risk that uses 10-minute mean wind speeds, observed over 900 stations of the Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System (AMeDAS) network in Japan to calculate peak gust wind speeds.
People use a hurricane's peak gust recorded in a one-square-mile area--never mind its sustained wind--to describe damage done over a 1,000-square-mile area.
A MeteoGroup UK forecaster said the peak gust it had recorded was 54mph in Odiham, Hampshire.
The statistical relationship between observed peak gust velocities and simultaneously measured fastest-minute wind was examined in order to determine "gust factors" appropriate to thunderstorm episodes in the Midwestern United States.
The average peak gust in Worcester was 46 to 47 mph, and sustained winds across the region averaged 35 mph.
In Eugene on Saturday, winds reached 28 mph with a peak gust of 32 mph at 1:39 p.
While tile roof systems have proven to withstand wind speeds in excess of 125 miles per hour in full scale wind testing, peak gust winds and down drafts can provide significantly higher uplifts leading to more extensive damage.
In the case of European windstorm and North Atlantic hurricane, reported (or calculated) peak gust wind speed was chosen.