peak joint

peak joint

At the ridge of a roof, the joint between members of a roof truss. (See illustration p. 710.)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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With regard to joint moments, most studies have focused on fatigue effects on the mean or single peak joint moment during landings (Cortes et al., 2013).
Subsequently, peak joint angles were identified for each limb, including ankle dorsiflexion, ankle plantar flexion, stance knee flexion, hip flexion and extension (angle between thigh and trunk due to frequent obstruction of pelvic markers by the load-bearing equipment or weapon), and trunk forward lean angle (relative to vertical).
The 95th percentile male recorded the highest peak joint torque values for the three joints.
Subjects' peak joint angles and overall ranges of motion of the leading (e.g., hand moving to new surface) and trailing (e.g., hand left on the old surface) wrists, elbows, shoulders and trunk during transfers were analyzed.
The study found that collagen deficient mice chose movements that limited peak joint forces and behaviours that reduced pain sensations.
At Rush Medical College, scientists compared wearing shoes to going barefoot, and to their surprise found that "peak joint loads at the hips and knees significantly decreased during barefoot walking, with a [twelve percent] reduction in the knee adduction moment." Their conclusion?
Our only regret is that we didn't bring counters." Glenn Elmore observed from the west edge of Santa Rosa: "We began at 10:45 UT with three of us observing different sections of the sky; our peak joint counting was 39 in one minute.
[23,24] did biomechanical kinematic and kinetic analyses of STS movements and computed minimum peak joint moments and analyzed the relation between movement time and joint moment development during a STS task.
Each peak joint moment and its variation are listed in Table 2; the peak joint moments at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints occurred in sequence (Figure 2).