peak

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peak

1. the pointed summit of a mountain
2. a mountain with a pointed summit
3. 
a. a sharp increase in a physical quantity followed by a sharp decrease
b. the maximum value of this quantity
c. (as modifier): peak voltage
4. Nautical
a. the extreme forward (forepeak) or aft (afterpeak) part of the hull
b. (of a fore-and-aft quadrilateral sail) the after uppermost corner
c. the after end of a gaff

peak

[pēk]
(geology)
The conical or pointed top of a hill or mountain.
An individual mountain or hill taken as a whole, used especially when it is isolated or has a pointed, conspicuous summit.
(meteorology)
The point of intersection of the cold and warm fronts of a mature extra-tropical cyclone.
(science and technology)
The maximum instantaneous value of a quantity.
References in classic literature ?
The broken and rugged road had wound along the crests of low hills, with wooded ridges on either side of it over which peeped the loftier mountains, the distant Peak of the South and the vast Altabisca, which towered high above them and cast its black shadow from left to right across the valley.
I looked at the last rays crowning the peak, and the shadows mounting by degrees up its slopes.
The real issue, they say, is when will the planet reach the peak of oil production, after which a slow decline will inevitably clash with demand that grows at two percent per year.
Kriging analysis, which illustrates geographic movement, showed that the starting areas of peak ILI activity were mostly found in western Japan.
The methyl peaks appear at 2,962/2,952 (split peak), 2,868 and 1,377 [cm.
As mentioned above, the combination of narrow peaks, accurate peak positions and intensities has advantages for crystallographic measurements.
If sunny days weren't enough, Sun Peaks lies in a weather zone that drops large quantities of the light, dry snow called ``champagne powder'' _ the kind of snow every skier dreams about.
Then something about the peaks reminded Castleman of work his lab group had done last year showing that water tended to form clusters of 20 molecules, trapping a 21st water molecule inside.
Therefore a panel of high thermal conductivity would show a higher temperature spike as the heat flowed unimpeded to the detection point on the backside of the panel, then the temperature would fall rapidly; whereas a low-conductivity panel would show a smaller temperature-rise peak followed by a lower rate of temperature d ecrease due to low thermal conductivity.
Another consideration is overloading of the counting system for intense peaks, resulting in pulse height depression and possible errors in dead-time corrections.
Typically, experimentalists make their initial estimates of texture from the relative intensities of Bragg peaks in conventional [theta]-2[theta] x-ray diffraction (XRD) scans, comparing peak intensities wit h those obtained from untextured (random) specimens.