pearlstone


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pearlstone

[′pərl‚stōn]
(geology)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Victoria Spencer, "Intellectual and Cultural Property Rights and Appropriation of Hopi Culture" in Pearlstone, Katsina, 170-77.
De acuerdo con Tulving y Pearlstone (1966), la informacion en la memoria puede encontrarse en dos estadios: disponible o accesible.
Freedman is Peggy Meyerhoff Pearlstone professor of political science at Baltimore Hebrew University and is a visiting professor of political science at Johns Hopkins University.
y Pearlstone 1972 "Episodic and Semantic Memory", "Organization of Memory".
Gregg Pearlstone is vice president of sales for Porta-King Building Systems (www.
Empirical research conducted by Tulving and Pearlstone (1966) disclosed that information which is not accessed in consumer memory when given a particular cue, may be retrieved if an alternative cue is used.
The five-year-old was second to Pearlstone last time out over two miles at Southwell and was travelling well until making a mistake at the last.
In 1911 Dave caught the eye of one of Connie Mack's informal scouts, a grocer from Palestine, Texas, named Hyman Pearlstone.
Together they evolved the Pearlstone range of vases decorated with raised, polished, cut circles contrasted against a matt sandblasted ground.
Differences in the accessibility of knowledge elements in different contexts (Tulving & Pearlstone, 1966), or failure of the subject to distinguish irrelevant material from relevant material when monitoring accessibility, would attenuate the correlation of confidence with performance.
In the study of Pearlstone et al,[15] atypia was a relatively common finding, ranging from 13% to 29% of smears, and repeat Pap smears for these patients had a relatively low predictive value in regard to underlying CIN.
Second, for more knowledgeable consumers it may increase accessibility and potential relevance of information of which consumers are aware but may not actively consider at the point of purchase without the availability of a specific cue, such as a warning (Tulving and Pearlstone 1966).