pebble-bed reactor


Also found in: Wikipedia.

pebble-bed reactor

[′peb·əl ‚bed rē‚ak·tər]
(nucleonics)
A nuclear reactor in which the fuel consists of small spheres or pellets stacked in the core; the reaction rate is controlled by coolant flow and by loading and unloading pellets.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The pebble-bed reactor consists of thousands of tiny pebbles of uranium fuel encased in graphite spheres, which are the size of tennis balls.
The research was aimed at developing an advanced high-temperature pebble-bed reactor (PBR), using beryllium oxide for the moderator--BeO pebbles, not graphite.
On technology, Indonesia is eyeing several types, including the pebble-bed reactor, an advanced nuclear reactor design that claims a dramatically higher level of safety and efficiency.
Rather than being assembled into long fuel rods, the nuclear fuel in a pebble-bed reactor is contained in small, tennis ball-sized "pebbles.
Beijing's Tsinghua University is heading a project to build a 10-megawatt prototype pebble-bed reactor, with a 200-megawatt production plant planned for 2007, and 29 more in the next 15 years.
Those advocating nuclear power point to the pebble-bed reactor as a less complex, safer, easier model for the future.
The pebble-bed reactor being developed under this project and in South Africa is a reactor for which such an objective can be reasonably attained by virtue of its low power density and special fuel design.
The author said his work in connection with Gen IV was in the area of design methods for very high temperature operation, as in the very high temperature helium-cooled pebble-bed reactor in South Africa.
Considering that a single ball in a pebble-bed reactor contains 16,000 fuel particles, such a failure rate would be unacceptably high.
Those attempts included one power-producing reactor using an organic moderator and coolant operated in Piqua, Ohio, in 1963, and several pebble-bed reactors in Germany, starting with the AVR in 1967.
New innovations, such as pebble-bed reactors, promise to increase safety further, but will be vastly more costly to adopt.
Pebble-bed reactors use uranium-specked graphite balls, rather than rods, for fuel.