peculiar

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peculiar

Church of England a church or parish that is exempt from the jurisdiction of the ordinary in whose diocese it lies
References in classic literature ?
The laws governing inheritance are quite unknown; no one can say why the same peculiarity in different individuals of the same species, and in individuals of different species, is sometimes inherited and sometimes not so; why the child often reverts in certain characters to its grandfather or grandmother or other much more remote ancestor; why a peculiarity is often transmitted from one sex to both sexes or to one sex alone, more commonly but not exclusively to the like sex.
There was a peculiarity in his manner of shaking hands, always to be seen in any clerk at Tellson's who shook hands with a customer when the House pervaded the air.
Stryver remarked upon the peculiarity as if it would have been infinitely less remarkable if he had said it with his head off.
Nothing was more remarkable than the instinct, as it seemed, with which the child comprehended her loneliness: the destiny that had drawn an inviolable circle round about her: the whole peculiarity, in short, of her position in respect to other children.
One peculiarity of the child's deportment remains yet to be told.
The third peculiarity of aerial warfare was that it was at once enormously destructive and entirely indecisive.
The marked peculiarity which singles him out from the rank and file of humanity lies entirely, so far as I can tell at present, in the extraordinary expression and extraordinary power of his eyes.
So far as the peculiarity of their case will admit of comparison with that of the United States, it serves to confirm the principle intended to be established.
The one cause of death had been Hemorrhage; and the one peculiarity which called for notice had been discovered in the mouth.
A peculiarity of the apparition, hardly noted at the time, but afterward recalled, was that it showed only the upper half of the woman's figure: nothing was seen below the waist.
In looking at a selenographic map, one peculiarity strikes us.
As the English succeeded the French, and found a peculiarity of nature, differing from all they had yet seen on the continent, already distinguished by a word that did not express any thing in their own language, they left these natural meadows in possession of their title of convention.