cephalopelvic disproportion

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Related to pelvimetry: clinical pelvimetry

cephalopelvic disproportion

[¦sef·ə·lō¦pel·vik ‚dis·prə′pȯr·shən]
(medicine)
A condition in which the fetus is unable to pass safely through the pelvis during labor because of pelvic contraction, an unfavorable fetal position, or a large fetal head in relation to pelvic size. Abbreviated CPD.
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References in periodicals archive ?
There have been very few scientific studies on external pelvimetry, perhaps because of today's modern technology like MRI, ultrasound 3D, digital tomography, etc.
Accordingly, the measurements taken using external pelvimetry make it possible to obtain, indirectly, the diameters of the internal pelvimetry, a principle that has motivated this study, using biostatistics as an important tool for calculation and prediction.
MR imaging pelvimetry: a useful adjunct in the treatment of women at risk for dystocia?
The diagnostic accuracy of external pelvimetry and maternal height to predict dystocia in nulliparous women: a study in Cameroon.
A comparison between clinical evaluation and radiologic pelvimetry. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 65:321-326.
1981.The predictability of labor outcome from a comparison of birth weight and x-ray pelvimetry. Am J Obstet Gynecol 139:507-511.
Cases Controls Characteristics (n) (n) Maternal age (years) < 20 21 30 20-33 418 423 [is greater than or equal to] 34 52 38 Maternal level of schooling University 90 95 College or completed secondary 244 256 Some secondary, primary, none 157 139 Pelvimetry None 458 449 1 25 34 >1 8 7 Abdominal X ray(a) No 487 488 Yes 4 2 Child's X rays(b) None 268 302 1 86 96 [is greater than or equal to] 2 119 82
Results for child's X rays adjusted for prenatal X rays (pelvimetry and abdominal X rays), maternal age, and level of schooling were as follows: one X ray, OR = 1.04 (CI, 0.72-1.49) and two or more X rays, OR = 1.61 (CI, 1.13-2.28).
Different imaging studies have been used for pelvimetry to identify the small pelvic diameters, examples include: ultrasound (Daghighi et al., 2013), X rays (Harper et al., 2013; Korhonen et al., 2014), computed tomography (CT) (Lenhard et al., 2009, 2010) and magnetic resonance (Huerta-Enochian et al., 2006; Korhonen et al., 2014; Sporri et al., 2002).
Magnetic resonance-based serial pelvimetry: do maternal pelvic dimensions change during pregnancy?
Smokers, single women, those with anemia, obesity, or poor nutrition, and those with small or borderline findings on clinical pelvimetry were more likely to plan hospital births (data not shown).
Examples: Asking whether clinical pelvimetry was documented in the chart of a multiparous woman who came in actively laboring, or asking if fundal height was measured in the office during a patient's last three prenatal visits.