penetration resistance

penetration resistance

1. The resistance by a subsoil to penetration by pile, casing, or sampling device; measured by the number of blows of a hammer of specified weight, falling through a specified distance to drive it a specified distance.
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The researchers looked at five specific soil properties: soil organic matter, penetration resistance, bulk density, water aggregate stability, and infiltration rate.
Subsequent investigation using an improved sintered bauxite product showed improvement in metal penetration resistance.
Penetration resistance was measured with an electronic penetrometer (Geotron hand penetrometer model P5 LT400, loadcell type SUB-G-200, error=0.
3) Materials ranging from cement, to rubber mulch, to plastic sandbag fibers were added to the basic mix to determine their effects on brick compressive strength and penetration resistance.
The meter offers a non-contact infrared depth and penetration speed sensor combined with simultaneous penetration resistance and temperature measurements.
The researchers also observed that after multiple irrigations, soil penetration resistance decreased as droplet size and energy increased, probably because the larger droplets hit the ground with enough force to loosen soil particles and erode surface soil.
There are a number of properties that make it a good choice for many pipeline installations: 1) Excellent adhesion to steel; 2) good chemical resistance; 3) non-shielding to CP fails friendly; 4) no reported cases of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of pipe coated with FBE; 5) installation friendly; 6) excellent penetration resistance, good abrasion and gouge resistance: 7) good impact resistance (impact damage is limited to the point of contact, damage is easily seen and damage is easily repaired); and 8) good flexibility.
The tests available at the Singapore lab include cathodic disbondment, hot water soak, non-destructive measurement of film, impact resistance and penetration resistance of pipeline coatings.
To meet both current and future threats, the Army called for a ceramic/metal composite armor solution that could provide enhanced blast and penetration resistance against both direct hits and fragments; would withstand both thermal shock and chemical attacks without being damaged or degraded; could tolerate harsh environments such as heat, cold, sand, water and salt; and could be produced at low costs and high volumes.
Bulk density, macroporosity, and penetration resistance were measured after harvest.