penitential


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Related to penitential: Penitential Psalms

penitential

Chiefly RC Church a book or compilation of instructions for confessors
References in periodicals archive ?
Cyril Vogel estimates it took about 20 to 30 minutes for each penitent in the medieval penitential order, which included psalms and prayers read by the priest, unfortunately in Latin, and followed by Mass.
I first examine the shifts in penitential practices during the period and the ways in which Hamlet's adoption of the role of confessor engages the ongoing theological and theatrical problem of determining the authenticity of another's confession.
She highlights the key role of Madeleine Luillier in bringing the order of the Ursulines to Paris, blending social activism and a commitment to the teaching of women with penitential retreat and a fervent, ascetic piety.
The provisions of this penitential system of justice do not, of course, set any conditions for its success as conducive to social reform, and here perhaps is the problem it poses if it is regarded as other than idealizing, as less prescriptive than hortatory.
The memorial, we are assured, is not designed for thoughtless acts of tourism, but is meant to unfold a processional narrative," to inspire the penitential supplicant with its "spiritual, contemplative character.
During this somber service, penitential prayers are recited asking for God's forgiveness.
A Commentary on the Penitential Psalms Translated by Dame Eleanor Hull, ed.
The students of Valencia are doubtless docile enough, but it seems unfortunate that their time at college, with all its attendant joys of academic and social discovery, should take place in such unremittingly penitential surroundings.
From a religious standpoint, Christians use the color purple to connote penance during the penitential season of Lent.
In 1988, for example, the artist installed a fully realized penitential figure, made of plaster and cloth, in the square in front of the old church in the medieval French village of Puycelsi.
Naturally, if these fellows lived in the real world, they would know that there is nothing in the least penitential about the meatless Friday.