penology

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penology

the science of prison management

penology

the systematic study of punishment, particularly imprisonment. The term was coined in the 19th-century along with the reorganization of the prison system and at a time of much debate about the purposes of imprisonment. In part, the introduction of the term reflected a ‘positivistic’ belief that a 'scientific’ solution could be found to many human problems. See also FOUCAULT, PANOPTICAN.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Court thus concluded that "[t]he restrictions were reasonably related to legitimate penological objectives.
The subjective views of prison officials may justify the denial of care, if based on "legitimate, penological considerations." (51) Consequently, the denial of adequate care in certain instances will be subject to a balancing test of those interests against the inmate's medical needs.
prisoner's rights at de minimis cost to valid penological
(22) Cognizant of the rights of prisoners and the pressing need for deference to the "professional expertise of corrections officials," (23) the Court sought to develop a standard that "is responsive both to the policy of judicial restraint regarding prisoner complaints and [to] the need to protect constitutional rights." (24) Under the standard established by the Court--the Turner test--a prison regulation that impinges on inmates' constitutional rights "is valid if it is reasonably related to legitimate penological interests." (25)
He found that the abolition of juvenile executions in a majority of states (thirty-one), including the recent abolition of the juvenile death penalty by seven states, and the infrequency with which state courts actually issued the sentence, evinced a national consensus that executing juveniles was a disproportionate punishment and could not be justified by traditional penological theories.
question advances a traditional penological goal or is "nothing
Inmates typically assert four basic arguments in support of their Lackey claim: (1) an execution after prolonged confinement is contrary to society's evolving standards of decency; (2) an execution after prolonged confinement is contrary to the Framers' intent; (3) an execution after prolonged confinement does not further the penological goals of deterrence and retribution; and (4) an execution after prolonged confinement is inconsistent with international norms.
The Court decided that a regulation that curtails fundamental constitutional rights can be upheld only if the restriction is "reasonably related to penological interests." (9) Legitimate "penological interests" typically include deterring crime, rehabilitating prisoners and ensuring institutional security.
In Prison State, Bert Useem and Anne Morrison Piehl take on the social and penological critiques and alarms over the increase of imprisonment in the US.
The plurality concluded that a state's "refusal to change its method [of execution] can be viewed as cruel and unusual" only if the state, "without a legitimate penological justification, rejects an alternative method that is feasible and readily available and that would significantly reduce a substantial risk of severe pain." (16) Roberts noted that none of the other currently available methods of execution met this standard, including the "one-drug protocol" (just sodium thiopental) that the petitioners urged.