percent defective

percent defective

[pər′sent di′fek·div]
(industrial engineering)
The ratio of defective pieces per lot or sample, expressed as a percentage.
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Why is this the case?In 2010, supporters of the draft social contract argued the 20 percent defective portion could be altered later.
The presented methodology considers the Percent Defective (PD) of quality testing as a probability distribution instead of only using deterministic values.
1--Collect and Analyze the Percent Defective (PD) of various pavement quality characteristics.
2--Estimate the Total Percent Defective ([PD.sub.T]) for pavement quality performance score.
The results of quality testing are transformed to Percent Defective (PD) as a quality measure that indicates how far the contractor from the specification limits.
The objectives in this course is the exploration of learning quality assurance and to document as evidence, the consistently improving student performance in the three major exams and finally the evidence of a comprehensive and defensible letter grade from "percent defective control chart by attribute." An attribute is good if the student got the concept right, and bad if she missed it altogether.
These attributes of learning outcomes or "retentions" are either good or bad--either the student "got it" or "not got it" so percent defective chart applies to the retention effort.
If there is no defective then percent defective is zero.
There are two kinds of attribute control charts (1) those that measure the percent defective in a sample called p-charts and (2) those that count the number of defects are called c-charts.
Mandelson (1962) explained a system of sampling plans indexed through Maximum Allowable Percent Defective. Mayer(1967) suggested that the quality standard 'p' can be considered as a quality level, along with certain other conditions to specify an operating characteristic curve later studied by Soundararajan (1975) as the quality level corresponding to the inflection point of the OC curve.
The PWL, or its complement the Percent Defective (PD), is currently the recommended statistical measure of specified materials and construction quality.
In the Possible Asphalt Content Populations chart, all three represented populations have 15 percent defective, yet each will result in a different pavement performance because too much asphalt content leads to bleeding and loss of skid resistance, and too little asphalt content leads to early deterioration.