percolation test


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percolation test

[pər·kə′lā·shən ‚test]
(civil engineering)
A test to determine the suitability of a soil for the installation of a domestic sewage-disposal system, in which a hole is dug and filled with water and the rate of water-level decline is measured.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

percolation test

A test to determine the rate at which a particular soil absorbs effluent; a hole is dug in the soil and filled with water, then the rate at which the water level drops is measured. (See illustration p. 716.)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The eluate collected during the up-flow percolation test of BCWC and BCLG at L/S ratios equal to 1, 3, and 5 l/kg DW was transferred to the laboratory for electrical conductivity (EC), pH and DOC measurements and trace metal analysis.
Since the percolation test is the tool most widely used to measure water flow capabilities of a field soil, several attempts have been made to find empirical relationships between the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and the percolation time (PT) with a hope of replacing the percolation test with a hydraulic conductivity test (Fritton, Ratvasky, & Petersen, 1986; Mulqueen & Rodgers, 2001; Winneberger, 1974).
The leaching limit values for hazardous waste calculated at L/S 10 l/kg and 2 l/kg for total release are presented in Table 3 and expressed in mg/l for the first eluate of percolation test at L/S 0.1 l/kg in Table 4.
The results from the percolation test are presented in figure.
Prior to installing such a system, a porosity test (percolation test) is needed to determine the absorption capacity of the soil.
In relation to prior studies using column percolation tests, Yong (2001) adopted a hydraulic gradient of the order of 55, Morandini and Leite (2015) adopted a hydraulic gradient of the order of 50, based on recommendations of the standard ASTM D 4874 (American Society for Testing and Materials [ASTM], 1995) it could be used a hydraulic gradient of 24, and Rojas, Consoli, and Heineck (2007) worked with a maximum hydraulic gradient of approximately 92.
The requirement for tree pit drainage should be established following percolation tests, and speci-fied accordingly.
He added that all percolation tests for a septic system have been completed with a successful result and there was a plan to built a wastewater treatment plant solely for the development, with the approval of the state Department of Environmental Protection, which issues permits for such plants.
Simple percolation tests can be used for the initial evaluation, which are supplemented with infiltrometer readings for the final design.
If, for example, a community relies primarily on wells and septic tanks for drinking water and wastewater treatment, respectively, then the environmental health practitioners who support that community need to be well versed on such systems and know about proper siting and how to do and interpret percolation tests. In areas where mosquito-borne diseases are endemic, environmental health practitioners need to know how to do trapping and surveillance to monitor vector levels and species in order to recommend control measures.
Percolation tests, and in some instances test borings, must be taken within each facility at the proposed bottom elevation, establishing a suitable infiltration rate, which is generally accepted to be 0.5 in.