Percolation

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percolation

[pər·kə′lā·shən]
(computer science)
The transfer of needed data back from secondary storage devices to main storage.
(hydrology)
Gravity flow of groundwater through the pore spaces in rock or soil.
(mining engineering)
Gentle movement of a solvent through an ore bed in order to extract a mineral.
(science and technology)
Slow movement of a liquid through a porous material.

Percolation

 

a method used to leach ores in a fixed bed, mainly, copper oxides and gold ores; leaching by this method is called percolation leaching. The process is carried out in a percolator tank. The pulverized ore is uniformly loaded onto the tank’s false bottom, which is a filtering device. The leaching solution is introduced either from beneath the false bottom, a process called upward leaching, or onto the surface of the load, a process called downward leaching; accordingly, the solution is collected either above or below the false bottom.

percolation

The downward movement of water into soil.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is seen that percolation routing is based on probability thus some paths may reach the destination finally whereas other paths will terminate at other nodes, without reaching the destination.
Then the percolation routing procedure is as follows.
4 Percolation based Data Transmission with Fountain Codes
Percolation belongs to Critical Phenomena because in the Critical Point some properties of the system change abruptly.
Percolation may also be used in social sciences to study the propagation of rumors and may capitalized by ill-intentioned politicians.
The minimum value of the probability P for percolation to take place is the Percolation Threshold Pc, in the case of bi-dimensional nearest neighbor site-percolation on the square lattice the Critical value of P is Pc = 0.
We can consider that LDPE with CB forms the conductive networks, resulting in a low percolation threshold.
5% and 5%, respectively, which is close to the percolation threshold of corresponding composites.
This sudden change in [eta]* means that the composites have reached a rheological percolation at which the conducting filler impedes the motion of polymers and the conducting component forms a network structure.
This phenomenon is characteristic of a transition from a liquid-like behavior to a solid-like one and is considered by many as the "theological" percolation threshold (2-8), (23-26).
It turned out that they all could allow for easy determination of the percolation threshold.
Figures 5-8 clearly show the percolation phenomena.