peg

(redirected from Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: Percutaneous Endoscopic Jejunostomy

peg

1. Informal a person's leg
2. Northern English dialect a tooth
3. Brit a small drink of wine or spirits, esp of brandy or whisky and soda
4. a mountaineering piton
5. Croquet a post that a player's ball must strike to win the game
6. Angling a fishing station allotted to an angler in a competition, marked by a peg in the ground
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Peg

A tapered cylindrical wooden pin that is driven through a hole to hold two or more members together.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

peg

[peg]
(engineering)
A small pointed or tapered piece, often cylindrical, used to pin down or fasten parts.
A projection used to hang or support objects.
(metallurgy)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

peg

1. A pointed pin of wood, metal, or any other material; usually used as a fastener.
2. A cylindrical piece of wood used as a dowel pin to fasten wood members.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pathogenic colonization of the stomach in enterally fed elderly patients: Comparing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with nasogastric tube.
Height and weight Z scores and presence of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) before and after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy were evaluated by dividing the subjects into two groups as <two years and [greater than or equal to] two years.
Long-term management of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy by a nutritional support team.
Local infection after placement of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes: a prospective study evaluating risk factors.
Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) refers to insertion of a tube into the stomach percutane- ously, aided by endoscope and was first described in 1980 by Gauderer.1 This was devised for feeding the patients who have swallowing problems due to any reason especially neurodisability.2,3 Feeding thro- ugh nasogastric tube can be prolonged for several weeks but is inconvenient and cumbersome for such patients besides its mechanical adverse effects.4,5
Deaths after delayed recognition of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube migration.
Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in cystic fibrosis: patient acceptance and effect of overnight tube feeding on nutritional status.
J., PhD., a bioethicist, recently stated that in the last few years the Mercy Health System in Philadelphia has been confronted with more and more "elderly and homeless persons who have no family or durable power of attorney for health care and have medical conditions that require mechanical ventilation, artificial nutrition, and hydration by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (a procedure wherein a tube is introduced into the stomach), intravenous antibiotics, various medications, and other similar treatments.
The G-Tube Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG) regimen minimizes patient trauma and maximizes physician efficiency.
Objective: investigation of length of survival, complications, level of dependence and recovery of swallow in patients who received percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) feeding for dysphagia due to stroke.

Full browser ?