perfectionism

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perfectionism

Philosophy the doctrine that man can attain perfection in this life
References in periodicals archive ?
Perfectionistic strivings will be negatively associated with the three subtypes of shame that will be positively associated with TTM in both samples.
As Alexander Martin writes, "she was very passionate and perfectionistic about her own work.
Perfectionism and eating disorder symptoms in female university students: The central role of perfectionistic self-presentation.
4-6) Factor analytic studies have provided evidence for two higher-order dimensions of perfectionism: personal standards (also known as perfectionistic strivings), reflecting individuals' self-oriented striving for perfection and setting of exceedingly high personal standards of performance, and evaluative concerns (also known as perfectionistic concerns), reflecting individuals' concerns over making mistakes, doubts about actions, and negative reactions to imperfection.
She's dark and funny and perfectionistic, but isn't jaded about all the possibilities for the medium.
As Mills and Chapman, (3) stated, "While being self-critical and perfectionistic may be common among doctors, being kind to oneself is not a luxury: it is a necessity.
Physicians can be demanding, perfectionistic and often see weakness in their burned-out colleagues.
Perfectionism has been operationalized along two dimensions: perfectionistic strivings and perfectionistic concerns (Rice, Richardson, & Tueller, 2014; Slaney, Rice, Mobley, Trippi, & Ashby, 2001; Stoeber& Otto, 2006).
The perfectionistic drive of most dancers may make them more predisposed to depression.
Self-oriented perfectionism concerns internal, self-influenced perfectionistic motivations; socially prescribed perfectionism involves the belief that significant others expect oneself to be perfect; and other-oriented perfectionism includes unrealistic standards and perfectionistic motivations for others (Hewitt et al.
Often they were perfectionistic (I should be better than this rather than I am good at some things and less good at others).
Where "Bad Moms" plunges into zesty, new satirical terrain is in capturing the ruthless one-upmanship of the mommy-wars era, when all the progressive thinking of the last 40 years has only ratcheted up the perfectionistic demands on children and parents alike.