perfection

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perfection

A long red cedar shingle having a butt thickness of 9/16 in. (1.4 cm).

Perfection

Giotto’s O
perfect circle drawn effortlessly by Giotto. [Ital. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 463]
golden mean
or section a proportion between the length and width of a rectangle or two portions of a line, said to be ideal. [Fine Arts: Misc.]
Grosvenor, Archibald
poet who has no earthly rival in his claim to being quite perfect. [Br. Opera: Gilbert and Sullivan Patience]
hole in one
score of one stroke for a hole in golf. [Sports: Webster’s Sports, 215]
Jesus Christ
son of God; personification of human flawlessness. [Christian Hist.: NCE, 1412]
perfect cadence
where the dominant passes into the harmony of the tonic chord. [Music: Thompson, 333]
perfect contrition
sorrow for sin, coming from a love of God for His own perfections. [Christianity: Misc.]
perfect game
baseball game in which all opposing batters are put out in succession. [Sports: Webster’s Sports, 311]
perfect number
equal in value to the sum of those natural numbers that are less than the given number but that also divide (with zero remainder) the given number. [Math.: EB, VII: 872]
royal flush
best possible hand in poker; one-suited hand from ten to ace. [Cards: Brewer Dictionary, 940]
Superman
Nietzsche’s ideal being, a type that would arise when man succeeds in surpassing himself. [Ger. Phil.: Thus Spake Zarathustra in Magill III, 1069]
300 game
bowling game of twelve consecutive strikes, scoring maximum 300 points. [Sports: Webster’s Sports, 311]
References in classic literature ?
The true perfection of man lies, not in what man has, but in what man is.
Caesar was very perfect, but his perfection travelled by too dangerous a road.
Don't imagine that your perfection lies in accumulating or possessing external things.
In fine, a healthy work of art is one that has both perfection and personality.
His object was to realise his own perfection as an artist, under certain conditions, and in certain forms of Art.
For an educated person's ideas of Art are drawn naturally from what Art has been, whereas the new work of art is beautiful by being what Art has never been; and to measure it by the standard of the past is to measure it by a standard on the rejection of which its real perfection depends.
Nioche knew his own language, and his appealing forlornness was quite the perfection of what the American, for vague reasons, had always associated with all elderly foreigners of the lesson-giving class.
But he regards the Court of Chancery, even if it should involve an occasional delay of justice and a trifling amount of confusion, as a something devised in conjunction with a variety of other somethings by the perfection of human wisdom for the eternal settlement (humanly speaking) of everything.
She hath married a gentleman, though perhaps not quite her equal in fortune; and if he hath any perfections in her eye which can make up that deficiency, I see no reason why I should object to her choice of her own happiness; which I, no more than herself, imagine to consist only in immense wealth.
But to make this the sole consideration of marriage, to lust after it so violently as to overlook all imperfections for its sake, or to require it so absolutely as to reject and disdain religion, virtue, and sense, which are qualities in their nature of much higher perfection, only because an elegance of person is wanting: this is surely inconsistent, either with a wise man or a good Christian.
As old John was not in the way at the moment, Joe, who was sitting in the bar ruminating on his dismal fate and the manifold perfections of Dolly Varden, ran out to hold the guest's stirrup and assist him to mount.
It makes one very humble to see oneself surrounded by such a wealth of beauty and perfection anonymously lavished, and to think of the infinite meanness of our own grudging charities, and how displeased we are if they are not promptly and properly appreciated.