perforations


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perforations

[‚pər·fə′rā·shənz]
(graphic arts)
Small rectangular sprocket holes along the edge of film.
(petroleum engineering)
Downwell holes made in well tubing, usually by shot-and-explosive or shaped-charge techniques; used for oil or gas production from desired horizons, or for injection of acidizing or fracturing fluids into the formation at predetermined depths.
References in periodicals archive ?
Assessment of quantitative hearing loss in relation to the morphology of central tympanic membrane perforations. 2004.
In our series, there was more gastric perforations than duodenal perforation, which is a reverse in the trend documented in the literature in our environment (4,5).
Determinants of hearing loss in perforations of the tympanic membrane.
Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed with a suspicion of iatrogenic esophageal perforation. Approximately 17 cm from the incisive teeth, a perforation site with a diameter of 1.5 cm was observed (Figure 1b).
Gallbladder perforation is a rare but life threatening complication of choliellithiasis.
Gelatin Sponge Patch group shown to be beneficial in repairing middle and large TM perforations increasing healing rates and shortening the healing time.
Management of Traumatic Perforations of the Tympanic Membrane: A Clinical Study.
Abdur-Rahman, "Salmonella intestinal perforation: (27 perforations in one patient, 14 perforations in another) are the goal posts changing?," Journal of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons, vol.
Clinical presentation and management of iatrogenic colon perforations. Am J Surg 1996;172:454-457.
The fact that many glove perforations go unnoticed by members of the surgical team has also been well-documented in the literature.
Traditionally, the most common techniques used to repair small tympanic membrane perforations in the outpatient office setting have been cauterization of the perforation margins, fat-graft tympanoplasty, and paper-patch tympanoplasty.