performance


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Related to performance: Performance management

performance

see COMPETENCE AND PERFORMANCE.

Performance

 

a stage presentation created by a theatrical group that includes the actors, stage designer, and composer and that is headed in the modern theater by the director.

In the dramatic theater, preparation for a performance begins with the selection of a play. The type of play chosen is determined by the spiritual and aesthetic needs of the prospective audience and the resources of the company. Keeping in mind the play’s aim, genre, and style, the director interprets the play and its major roles, plans the scenery, costumes, makeup, music, and lighting, and decides on the approach to the dialogue and to the actors’ movements on the stage.

One of the most important aspects in the staging of a performance is the planning of the mise-en-scene. However, the stage sets and properties as well as the performance’s tempo and rhythm become meaningful only with inspired acting. The director’s primary task is therefore to work with the actors during rehearsals. The mise-en-scene is reviewed when the staging has been completed, with the actors in costume and makeup and the performance coordinated to music and sound effects. The lighting effects as well assume their final form at this time. The last stage in the preparation of a performance is the dress rehearsal, which is held in public and which gives the theatrical group an opportunity to understand to what extent their aims have been attained.

The great importance of music, singing, and choreography in the opera and ballet determines the major role played by the conductor and choreographer during the staging of a performance.

REFERENCES

Gorchakov, N. M. Rabota rezhissera nad spektaklem. Moscow, 1956. Popov, A. Khudozhestvennaia tselostnost’spektaklia. Moscow, 1959.

K. L. RUDNITSKII

References in classic literature ?
When the first part of the performance was over, the Owner and Manager of the circus, in a black coat, white knee breeches, and patent leather boots, presented himself to the public and in a loud, pompous voice made the following announcement:
Before I leave you, I wish to state that there will be another performance tomorrow night.
Before starting your performance, salute your audience
Again and again, as he looked at each brutal performance, the lesson was driven home to Buck: a man with a club was a lawgiver, a master to be obeyed, though not necessarily conciliated.
It was during the afternoon performance, and the big tent was filled with women and children, when I went looking for Red Denny, the head canvas-man, who had walked off with my pocket-knife.
What more has the Manager of the Performance to say?
But persons who think otherwise, and are of a lazy, or a benevolent, or a sarcastic mood, may perhaps like to step in for half an hour, and look at the performances.
The repetition of the performance at this point was received with a burst of laughter.
Philander and Gustavus, after having raised their reputation by their Performances in the Theatrical Line at Edinburgh, removed to Covent Garden, where they still exhibit under the assumed names of LUVIS and QUICK.
The performances of these social outcasts, crude and immoral as they were, continued for centuries unsuppressed, because they responded to the demand for dramatic spectacle which is one of the deepest though not least troublesome instincts in human nature.
But as some of them were united into extended groups and as the interest of the congregation deepened, the churches began to seem too small and inconvenient, the excited audiences forgot the proper reverence, and the performances were transferred to the churchyard, and then, when the gravestones proved troublesome, to the market place, the village-green, or any convenient field.
But as Nature often exhibits some of her best performances to a very full house, so will the behaviour of her spectators no less admit the above-mentioned comparison than that of her actors.

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