pericarp


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Related to pericarp: exocarp, endocarp, mesocarp

pericarp

1. the part of a fruit enclosing the seeds that develops from the wall of the ovary
2. a layer of tissue around the reproductive bodies of some algae and fungi

Pericarp

 

the wall surrounding the seed of a plant. It develops from the embryo, sometimes with the other organs attached to it that make up the flower (for example, the perianth). The pericarp comprises the epicarp, endocarp, and mesocarp. The epicarp develops from the outer epidermis, the endocarp from the inner epidermis, and the mesocarp from the mesophyll of the carpel. If the mesophyll is differentiated into various tissues, then there is an exomesocarp (for example, the succulent part of a cherry) and a mesendocarp (the pit). The pericarp’s consistency is used in the classification of fruits (for example, dry or juicy) and helps identify fruits as being nuts, berries, or drupes.

pericarp

[′per·ə‚kärp]
(botany)
The wall of a fruit, developed by ripening and modification of the ovarian wall.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the insect is a generalized feeder that has no fidelity to Cannabis, and the base of wild achenes do not develop a genuine elaiosome, although the detachment zone is a weak area of the protective pericarp, and might offer some limited nutrition to insects.
Due to its fibrous pericarp and mealy flesh, the free water in the deeper tissues of the fruit was lost at the same rate as the water in the more superficial tissues closer to the exocarp.
2003) conducted a number of both in vivo and in vitro assays that demonstrated the anti-angiogenic properties of different pomegranate fractions, namely, pomegranate fermented juice polyphenols, pomegranate pericarp polyphenols, and pomegranate seed oil fractions.
The process includes wherein the pericarp and germ are removed from the corn kernel and processed for by-products.
The measure of surface area is used to describe spatial heterogeneity of a synthetic structure, and of an image of tomato pericarp.
A very elastic pericarp containing a great number of small seeds.
David Jackson, a food-chemist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, says that scientists have known for years that the kernel's pericarp is important to popping.
The husk, or pericarp, of this new variety was not adhesive to the rice grain.
manuscripts in preparation) have shown that they are not present in the pericarp of the olive drupes, nor in the leaves and twigs that may be present in the mulch prepared for olive pressing.
The consequent "little book" institutes its "grand claims" as movement from within a tiny pericarp, but this stirring stays within dignified bounds.
The enzymes in Accelerator(TM) Plus help digest the pericarp (the outer shell of corn and other cereal feed grains), which causes the formation of pit crust.