perigee

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perigee

(pĕr`ĭjē), point nearest the earth in the orbit of a body about the earth. See apsisapsis
(pl. apsides), point in the orbit of a body where the body is neither approaching nor receding from another body about which it revolves. Any elliptical orbit has two apsides.
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perigee

(pe -ră-jee) The point in the orbit of the Moon or an artificial Earth satellite that is nearest the Earth and at which the body's velocity is maximal. Strictly, the distance to the perigee is taken from the Earth's center. The distance to the Moon's perigee varies; on average it is about 363 300 km. Compare apogee.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Perigee

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Every orbit is elliptical. When a satellite is closest to Earth, it is at its perigee (from the Greek peri, meaning “near,” and gaia, meaning “earth”).

The Astrology Book, Second Edition © 2003 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Perigee

 

the point in the orbit of the moon or an artificial satellite that is nearest the earth. Perturbations change the position of the perigee in space. Thus, because of perturbations caused by the sun, the moon’s perigee moves along an orbit in the same direction as the moon, completing a revolution in 8.85 years. The shift in the perigee of an artificial earth satellite chiefly arises from the aspherical nature of the earth, and the magnitude and direction of this motion depend on the inclination of the orbital plane of the satellite to the plane of the earth’s equator. The distance from the perigee to the center of the earth is called the perigee distance.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

perigee

[′per·ə‚jē]
(astronomy)
The point in the orbit of the moon or other satellite when it is nearest the earth.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

perigee

the point in its orbit around the earth when the moon or an artificial satellite is nearest the earth
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

apogee

The farthest point. It often refers to the point at which a commercial satellite is farthest from the earth in its elliptical orbit. The "perigee" is the point closest to the earth.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consequently, the tidal variations caused by once-monthly so-called perigean tides are much more prominent.
While in most waters, the largest tides occur in the same part of the year, in the Bay of Fundy they are more influenced by the shifting coincidence of spring and perigean tides with the result that each year they occur about 47 days later than in the previous year.
Stated otherwise, the perigean tides become more important than the spring tides.
This can be explained by the dominance of perigean tides on the west side of the ocean.
Tidal streams might help to erode the bases of grounded icebergs, and the high waters during perigean spring tides could play a role in refloating grounded and even apparently "stranded" icebergs, especially those stranded at the time of a normal high water.
As a modification of Wood's original idea linking astronomy and the Titanic, we suggest that perigean spring tides during each of those three months--especially the period near the extreme lunar perigee on January 4th--could have helped to refloat icebergs.
Perigean spring tides are outstanding, while apogean spring tides hardly differ from average tides.
This is the case in regions like the Bay of Fundy where diurnal inequality of the tides is of such minor importance that it can be virtually ignored among variations caused by the coincidence of perigean and spring tides.
Heaviest ice conditions occur one or two months before perigean and spring tides combine to form the largest tide of the cycle.
If the time of lunar perigee falls near a syzygy, then perigean spring tides of unusually large range can occur.
It is worth emphasizing that perigean spring tides have greatly increased range, bringing both extremely high tides and extremely low tides on the same day.
During this period of perigean spring tides, all the low waters were lower than normal.