Periodontitis

(redirected from periodontal disease)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

periodontitis

[¦per·ē·ō‚dän′tīd·əs]
(medicine)
Inflammation of the periodontium.

Periodontitis

 

an acute or chronic inflammation of the periodontium and adjacent tissues. Periodontitis is usually a result of dental caries and arises as infection spreads from the root canal through the apical foramen to the apex of the root. It may also develop from frequently recurring injury to the tooth; this kind of injury can result from such occupational habits as biting thread or grasping metal nails with the teeth and from any habitual biting of hard objects, for example, pencils or the mouthpieces of pipes.

Acute periodontitis is manifested by sharp pain in the region of the tooth that intensifies when the inflamed area is touched. Swelling often occurs in the gums, lips, or cheeks, and the affected tooth becomes loose. The enlarged submaxillary lymph nodes become sensitive, and fever occasionally arises. The process may sometimes be complicated by osteomyelitis of the jaw, purulent inflammation of the soft tissues of the face and neck, and acute sepsis. Symptoms of chronic periodontitis usually include discomfort while chewing, halitosis, and sometimes fistulas on the gums and facial skin. Chronic periodontitis can lead to the formation of a cyst of the jaw, and both forms of periodontitis can sensitize the body to streptococci.

Treatment of periodontitis is usually conservative, consisting of filling the root canals. Often the tooth is removed. Abscesses are lanced, and antibiotics are used to treat pronounced general symptoms.

REFERENCES

Groshikov, M. I. Periodontit. Moscow, 1964.
Marchenko, A. I. “Bolezni periodonta.” In Rukovodstvo po terapevticheskoi stomatologii. Moscow, 1967.
Ovrutskii, G. D., F. G. Gasimov, and S. V. Makarov. Bolezni zubov. Kazan, 1967.
Rybakov, A. I., and V. S. Ivanov. Klinika terapevticheskoi stomatologii. Moscow, 1973.

G. D. OVRUTSKII

References in periodicals archive ?
Brushing is essential to keeping the gingiva healthy and prevents any underlying periodontal disease from progressing.
Similarly, a meta-analysis on periodontal disease and risk of PTB and low birth weight support this finding.
This provides a frame work for viewing the contributions and relative importance of all components that contribute to the clinical presentation of the periodontal disease and individual response, including cytokines and lipid mediators, produced by the host, as well as alterations in bone and connective tissue, can be clearly characterized by a specific pattern of gene, protein, and metabolite expression.
The purpose of this meta-analysis was to determine the relationship between periodontal disease and coronary heart disease.
Obesity leads to chronic inflammation, and some authors believe that periodontal disease does, also.
What makes periodontal disease particularly dangerous is that the toxic mix of bacteria and inflammatory products that accumulates below the gum line can access the bloodstream and may contribute to problems elsewhere in the body.
Another study done on "Association between type 1 and type 2 diabetes with periodontal disease and tooth loss" confirmed an association between both type 1 and type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with periodontitis and tooth loss.
This will lower your immune response and minimize the progression of periodontal disease and, we suspect, heart disease," says Dr.
In the case of periodontal disease, three major randomized controlled trials in the United States--including the Periodontal Infections and Prematurity Study (PIPS) published in February of this year--have provided evidence that screening and treating periodontal disease during pregnancy are not likely to reduce rates of preterm birth.
Low explains that the prevalence of periodontal disease makes it essential to maintain healthy teeth and gums.
In the case of periodontal disease, three major randomized controlled trials in the United States - including the Periodontal Infections and Prematurity Study (PIPS) published in February of this year--have provided evidence that screening and treating periodontal disease during pregnancy are not likely to reduce rates of preterm birth.