Periosteal Bone


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Periosteal Bone

 

in vetebrates, a bone that originates without undergoing a cartilaginous stage. An aggregate of cells of skeletogenous mesenchyme form osteoblasts and then a bone. In the process of vertebrate evolution, most periosteal bones were formed from cutaneous scales embedded in the skin. Examples include the frontal and temporal bones (seeSUBSTITUTION BONE). [20–487–l]

References in periodicals archive ?
histolyticum ColH and demonstrated that this system accelerates periosteal bone formation and growth in bone fracture and defect models [28-30, 45].
Soft tissue swelling, clubbing, and periosteal bone changes, particularly in the long bones of the fingers, toes, and lower extremities, can be observed in patients with thyroid acropathy.
In all eight resected cases, a distinction between cortical and periosteal bone was attempted histologically by light microscopy and polarized light microscopy.
A possible explanation for the disappointing BMD results when PTH is preceded by a potent antiresorptive agent is that the hormone increases endosteal porosity and encourages new periosteal bone formation, with a resultant increase in cortical area.
By 26 weeks, ossification has progressed, and growth of the outer layer of periosteal bone has resulted in a partial closure of the sulcus, forming the fallopian canal.
Tumors are fusiform (spindle shaped), with periosteal bone formation appearing as Codman triangles (see Fig.
Seven weeks after OVX, there were increases in the periosteal perimeter, cortical area, and periosteal bone formation indices, indicating that ovariectomy increased modeling-dependent bo ne on the periosteal envelope, relative to controls.
Those located in the extremities are well limited in the outer surface and covered by a thin shell of newly formed periosteal bone or directly by the periosteum.
The typical radiographic appearances of osteoarticular tuberculosis in the extremities, the second most common form after tuberculous spondylitis, are metaphyseal or epiphyseal lesions that lack sclerosis, sequestra, or periosteal bone reaction.
In 1992, because of the ease of procurement, we began using periosteal bone (femur) as a replacement source in all ossiculoplasties, including tympanoplasties, tympanomastoidectomies, and stapedectomies.