Periosteal Bone


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Periosteal Bone

 

in vetebrates, a bone that originates without undergoing a cartilaginous stage. An aggregate of cells of skeletogenous mesenchyme form osteoblasts and then a bone. In the process of vertebrate evolution, most periosteal bones were formed from cutaneous scales embedded in the skin. Examples include the frontal and temporal bones (seeSUBSTITUTION BONE). [20–487–l]

References in periodicals archive ?
It has been reported that T has an osteoanabolic effect on the skeleton during puberty and this effect is mediated by periosteal bone formation, which is partly dependent on androgen receptor (AR) signaling, and partly on estradiol, which may then interact with the dominant regulator of bone formation, that is GH-IGF-I (Sinnesael et al.
Soft tissue swelling, clubbing, and periosteal bone changes, particularly in the long bones of the fingers, toes, and lower extremities, can be observed in patients with thyroid acropathy.
In the sections examined, periosteal bone tended to be less organized than cortical bone, with irregular architecture.
The pattern is believed to represent either an acceleration of the normal periosteal bone response or alternating periods of rapid and slow growth.
A possible explanation for the disappointing BMD results when PTH is preceded by a potent antiresorptive agent is that the hormone increases endosteal porosity and promotes new periosteal bone formation, with a resultant increase in cortical area.
A possible explanation for the disappointing BMD results when PTH is preceded by a potent antiresorptive agent is that the hormone increases endosteal porosity and encourages new periosteal bone formation, with a resultant increase in cortical area.
By 26 weeks, ossification has progressed, and growth of the outer layer of periosteal bone has resulted in a partial closure of the sulcus, forming the fallopian canal.
Tumors are fusiform (spindle shaped), with periosteal bone formation appearing as Codman triangles (see Fig.