peripheral

(redirected from peripherality)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

peripheral

Anatomy of, relating to, or situated near the surface of the body

peripheral

[pə′rif·ə·rəl]
(anatomy)
Pertaining to or located at or near the surface of a body or an organ.
(computer science)
(science and technology)
Remote from the center; marginal; on the periphery.

peripheral

(hardware)
(Or "peripheral device", "device") Any part of a computer other than the CPU or working memory, i.e. disks, keyboards, monitors, mice, printers, scanners, tape drives, microphones, speakers, cameras, to list just the less exotic ones.

High speed working memory, such as RAM, ROM or, in the old days, core would not normally be referred to as peripherals. The more modern term "device" is also more general in that it is used for things such as a pseudo-tty, a RAM drive, or a network adaptor.

Some argue that, since the advent of the personal computer, the motherboard, hard disk, keyboard, mouse, and monitor are all parts of the base system, and only use the term "peripheral" for optional additional components.

peripheral

Any input, output or storage device connected externally or internally to the computer's CPU, such as a monitor, keyboard, mouse, printer, hard disk, graphics tablet, scanner, joystick or paddle. Pronounced "per-if-uh-rul." See peripheral bus.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his "Overview of the Issues" Labov claims that he is introducing "a new conception of English phonological space, and a new conception of the feature peripherality shared by other Gennanic and Baltic languages that show the diphthongization of [i:] and [u:] to [Ii] and [Uu].
The next section of the note provides an overview of approaches to the measurement and appreciation of peripherality and presents an alternative.
Peripherality as a narrative concept therefore only makes sense as an intermediary area on a scale, and one definitely has to allow for its possible ambiguity and indeterminacy.
fragmentation, rivalry, and peripherality have been key themes in the region's development.
Born and brought up in the political and cultural realms of European and American empires, Said and Ahmad were made by the very matter and knowledge of peripherality.
One of their main aims through advertising their associations with modernity is to convey the impression that their leadership will enable the community to 'come up' and thereby negate its peripherality in the wider context.
Developing the skills and attitudes to allow the region to compete as a modern advanced economy and to develop an entrepreneurial spirit in all sectors of the economy and society is critical to overcoming the twin challenges of deprivation and peripherality which characterise much of the region.
One of the anonymous reviewers suggested that it could be the other way around: the fact that peripherality is a central syntactic attribute of the TC prototype could explain condition (b) of predication, in which case this condition would become superfluous and predication would boil down to mere argumenthood.
Black talk certainly fits this description, but as the speech act of a minority, its particularity further connotes its sense of peripherality - of the eagerly guarded "privacy" that Reesie and her friends talk about.
To top the sense of extreme peripherality, the Jordans' house stands at the end of the Flats Road, a circumstance that Del's mother seems to find an advantage: "My mother corrected me when I said we lived on the Flats Road; she said we lived at the end of the Flats Road, as if that made all the difference" (Munro, 6).
Nevertheless this trend, which appears to be continuing, opens up new opportunities for Spanish companies, which are not disadvantaged by the relative peripherality of their location in the European market.
He said: "I think the peripherality of West Wales and Mid Wales is an issue that has concerned the chamber for some time.