peripheral

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peripheral

Anatomy of, relating to, or situated near the surface of the body

peripheral

[pə′rif·ə·rəl]
(anatomy)
Pertaining to or located at or near the surface of a body or an organ.
(computer science)
(science and technology)
Remote from the center; marginal; on the periphery.

peripheral

(hardware)
(Or "peripheral device", "device") Any part of a computer other than the CPU or working memory, i.e. disks, keyboards, monitors, mice, printers, scanners, tape drives, microphones, speakers, cameras, to list just the less exotic ones.

High speed working memory, such as RAM, ROM or, in the old days, core would not normally be referred to as peripherals. The more modern term "device" is also more general in that it is used for things such as a pseudo-tty, a RAM drive, or a network adaptor.

Some argue that, since the advent of the personal computer, the motherboard, hard disk, keyboard, mouse, and monitor are all parts of the base system, and only use the term "peripheral" for optional additional components.

peripheral

Any input, output or storage device connected externally or internally to the computer's CPU, such as a monitor, keyboard, mouse, printer, hard disk, graphics tablet, scanner, joystick or paddle. Pronounced "per-if-uh-rul." See peripheral bus.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, if we do this with Marxism we quickly discover Marxism is not a theory of all the oppressed since (1) a theory of women wouldn't fail to highlight rape and violence against women; (2) a theory of blacks wouldn't peripheralize the cultural dimension of racism and denigrate spirituality; and (3) a theory of the politically disenfranchised wouldn't promote electoral forms that continually return the same people to power or advocate Leninist discipline.
It is perhaps not a coincidence that some novels by the celebrated Bahian writer Jorge Amado incorporate turco/Arab characters as part of the Brazilian melange; but whether portraying Christian, or at times Muslim, Arabs, for example in such novels as Gabriela, cravo e canela (1958; Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon), Showdown (1984), and A Descoberta da America Pelos Turcos (1994; How the Turks Discovered America), his thoroughly hybrid Brazil peripheralizes the West African Muslims of his native Bahia.
While Young and Huie illuminate the motives behind white aggression, Richardson points out how disclosure of such masculine terror peripheralizes the rape of women, in general.