peritonsillar abscess

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peritonsillar abscess

[‚per·ə′täns·əl·ər ′ab‚ses]
(medicine)
An abscess forming in acute tonsillitis around one or both tonsils.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our case would support the need for a high index of suspicion when findings are not classic for peritonsillar abscess with consideration of imaging and/or a surgical procedure.
The contemporary approach to diagnosis and management of peritonsillar abscess.
Pathological radio-opaque calcifications simulating tonsilloliths are of vasculature (atherosclerosis or phleboliths), lymph node calcification, calcified peritonsillar abscess, salivary gland sialolith or an intraosseous abnormality within the mandibular ramus.
Tonsils and peritonsillar tissues are frequently the primary source of infections (10,11,13).
Contrast-enhanced CT of the neck and chest revealed a large right-sided peritonsillar abscess (Figure 1), thrombus along the anterior aspect of the right internal jugular vein (Figure 2), and multiple septic pulmonary emboli (Figure 3).
Twelve had concomitant parapharyngeal abscess and one had concomitant peritonsillar abscess.
Peritonsillar abscess, also known as quinsy, is the most common deep infection of the head and neck in adults.
If one were to examine a cross-section of a healthy tonsil, it would reveal that a robust superior constrictor muscle (SCoM) separates the peritonsillar space from the parapharyngeal fat.
An abscess in this space may arise from direct extension of infection from the pharynx through the pharyngeal wall, as a consequence of odontogenic infection, local trauma, and occasionally peritonsillar abscess.
1) Common indications are recurrent tonsillitis, obstructive sleep apnoea, peritonsillar abscess, or suspicion of a serious underlying disorder.
Other causes include fractured mandibles, foreign bodies and lacerations on the floor of the mouth, traumatic procedures, infection of oral malignancies, otitis media, and peritonsillar abscesses, among other causes (5) The usual symptoms include dysphagia, neck swelling, and pain; other symptoms include dysphonia, drooling, tongue swelling, pain in the floor of the mouth, and sore throat.
1) An aberrant ICA is susceptible to devastating injury during routine ENT procedures such as tonsillectomy and drainage of peritonsillar abscess.