peritonsillar abscess


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Related to peritonsillar abscess: tonsillitis

peritonsillar abscess

[‚per·ə′täns·əl·ər ′ab‚ses]
(medicine)
An abscess forming in acute tonsillitis around one or both tonsils.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wilson, "A review of the pathogenesis of adult peritonsillar abscess: time for a re-evaluation," The Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, vol.
The vast majority (>70%) of peritonsillar abscess are polymicrobial and present aerobic and anaerobic organisms.
Treatment of peritonsillar abscess is intraoral drainage of pus followed by antibiotics.
Standard follow-up for a minimum of 2 years, consisting of a detailed clinical examination and frequent cross-sectional imaging, is important in all cases of suspected peritonsillar abscess in which the clinical course does not exactly match the typically described course of the disease.
Treatment of peritonsillar abscess remains controversial.
More recently, we conducted a study to assess the effectiveness of an antibiotic-steroid protocol in Native Americans, who have a particularly high incidence of peritonsillar abscess. The Indian Health Service, a subsidiary of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, had been spending large sums of money to air-evacuate patients from rural field hospitals and clinics to our referral hospital in Phoenix for definitive otolaryngologic care because the outlying practitioners were not comfortable treating peritonsillar abscess.
A diagnosis of bilateral peritonsillar abscess was suspected when fluctuance was elicited on finger palpation.
Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain development of peritonsillar abscess. One is by direct spread of an inadequately treated acute tonsillitis, where the infection directly spreads to peritonsillar space and results in peritonsillar cellulitis and abscess.
Aberrant RP course of internal carotid artery (ICA) is a very rare cause of RP swelling, usually presenting as a pulsatile pseudotumor, but may be misdiagnosed as peritonsillar abscess or parapharyngeal neoplasm (3).
Whether it was strep throat, quinsy (peritonsillar abscess) or bacterial epiglottitis, the microbial battle began years earlier in the gingival crevices, before he became edentulous.
Our study showed very few peritonsillar infections (2.4%), though this could be a result of not including the ICD-9 code for peritonsillar abscess. Their second most common location was retropharyngeal (22.0%), which was similar to our results.
The peritonsillar abscess (PTA) is the most common deep head and neck infection that affects patients of all ages and results in numerous outpatient visits and hospitalizations [5].