permeate

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permeate

[′pər·mē‚āt]
(chemical engineering)
The clear fluid that passes through the membrane in a membrane filtration process.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 3: A 35-year-old male with frontal radiograph of the distal right forearm: there is permeative mixed sclerosis and lucency in the distal radial and ulnar metaphysis and epiphysis (arrows).
However, radiographs at follow-up demonstrated a permeative lesion with ill-defined margins and soft tissue extension, strongly suggestive of a malignancy.
Add to that the revelation that Agrarian modernism was itself infected by the permeative presence of industrial capitalism to no less degree than they claimed was the regionalists' version, and it becomes impossible to maintain that Southern modernism can or should be represented only by the Agrarian model.
5.) Particularly when osteosarcomas occur in diaphyseal rather than metaphyseal regions, they may exhibit layered, onionskin periosteal reactions.[1] It is important to note that rapidly expanding osteosarcoma tumors, which are typified by permeative bone destruction, may provoke no visible periosteal reactions.
Despite the permeative divisions in Dutch society, democracy and limited government remained relatively stable during the period studied.
The mandible was described as irregular and "moth-eaten" in appearance, with diffuse enlargement, suggesting a permeative process.
The property of being a citizen of the PRC is neither emergent like shape nor 'permeative' like uniform density and yet it is wholly located wherever a citizen of the PRC happens to be.
Similar to other aggressive osseous tumors, bony manifestations include permeative, moth eaten lucencies, a wide zone of transition and associated soft-tissue mass.
Histologically, chondrosarcomas are composed of malignant cells with abundant cartilaginous matrix, hypercellularity, plump nuclei, binucleate cells, permeative pattern and entrapment of bony trabeculae.
In contrast, malignant lesions often have a "moth-eaten" or permeative appearance.
Radiographically, most low-grade osteosarcomas involve the metadiaphysis with cortical bone destruction and a permeative growth pattern.
Radiological survey revealed multiple new and old permeative lesions causing marrow expansion, cortical thinning and microfractures in metadiaphyseal regions of long bones (Figure-1 and 2).