permissible exposure limit


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permissible exposure limit

[pər¦mis·ə·bəl ik′spō·zhər ‚lim·ət]
(industrial engineering)
The level of air contaminants that represents an acceptable exposure level as specified in standards set by a national government agency; generally expressed as 8-hour time-weighted average concentrations. Abbreviated PEL.
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* Consistent with good industrial-hygiene practice, periodically monitor or sample the work environment during lamp-processing and -crushing activities to ensure that the lamp-crushing unit is operating efficiently and that permissible exposure limits are not exceeded.
Workplace exposure to lead through airborne means is measured by a permissible exposure limit (PEL) and is set at 50 [micro]g of lead per cubic meter of air ([micro]g/[m.sup.3]), averaged over an 8-hour workday (OSHA 2003).
* Exposure limits - eight-hour time-weighted average (TWA) permissible exposure limit (PEL of 1 part BD per million parts air [ppm]); short-term exposure limit (STEL) of 5 ppm over a 15-minute period; and an action level of 0.5 ppm.
As originally proposed, the rule called for a reduced permissible exposure limit of one part formaldehyde per million parts of air as an eight hour time weighted average.
Medical consultations and examinations are given to employees when they develop symptoms associated with a chemical to which they have been exposed, where exposure monitoring reveals an exposure level routinely above the action level or, if no action level exists, above the permissible exposure limit.
All reported levels are substantially below the current OSHA permissible exposure limit of 0.2 fibers/cm.
OSHA cited the company for exposing employees to silica levels over the permissible exposure limit and electric shock hazards; failing to develop and implement written procedures for a hazardous energy control program, conduct monitoring to determine employees exposure to silica, and use machine guarding on equipment; blocking emergency exits; and exceeding the noise action level.
OSHA continues to enforce the new permissible exposure limit of 0.2 micrograms of beryllium per cubic meter of air and the short-term exposure limit of 2 micrograms per cubic meter of air for general industry.
This will require a company to conduct independent testing, with specific documentation on exposure levels and what steps a worker must take to stay below the permissible exposure limit (50 micrograms per cubic meter) over a time-weighted eight-hour day.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration will soon publish a final workplace exposure standard for crystalline silica that will cut the permissible exposure limit in half.
In August, the agency proposed a new permissible exposure limit that updates the current beryllium standard, which was established by the Atomic Energy Commission in 1948 and adopted by OSHA in 1971.
Of the 13 sectors, rock and sandblasting associated with building pipelines and digging wells has the fourth-highest number of workers exposed to crystalline silica above the permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 100 micrograms.