perpetual calendar


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perpetual calendar

[pər′pech·ə·wəl ′kal·ən·dər]
(astronomy)
A table or mechanical device used to determine the day of the week corresponding to any given date over a period of many years.
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Its two half-moon subdials show a perpetual calendar under an anti-reflective sapphire crystal.
RARITY The Roman perpetual calendar found at Vindolanda
Everything had its place: the sugar and coffee, the cooking oil, the knives, the clocks, the perpetual calendar on the wall, the old photographs on the dresser.
Russian President Vladimir Putin sports a pounds 50,000 Patek Philippe Perpetual Calendar while fellow Russian and owner of Chelsea Football Club Roman Abromavitch prefers a pounds 25,000 Rolex Daytona.
While some items are perennial best sellers, such as the Michael Graves teapot or a perpetual calendar by the Museum of Modern Art, Chiasso changes about half of its assortment every six months.
Show after show, lecture after concert, he sustained a perpetual calendar of events.
A practical result was a perpetual calendar which, according to Engelen, can still be used.
The Blue Toro is a limited edition certified chronometer with a self-winding perpetual calendar that is conscious of leap years, so it doesn't have to be reset.
It has 24 features - called complications - including the Westminster chimes, a perpetual calendar and a map of the stars above the home of New York banker Henry Graves, who commissioned it in 1925.
The watch also comes with a perpetual calendar (offering accurate dates up to February 2100) and daylight saving time features.
Two of the most popular complications in horology today are the rattrapante or split seconds chronograph and the perpetual calendar.
Putin owns a Flyback worth 6,450 pounds and a Patek Philippe Perpetual Calendar worth 39,000 pounds.