persistence of vision


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persistence of vision

[pər′sis·təns əv ′vizh·ən]
(physiology)
The ability of the eye to retain the impression of an image for a short time after the image has disappeared.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(9) Martin Scorsese, 'Persistence of Vision: Reading the Language of Cinema', 2013 Jefferson Lecture, National Endowment for the Humanities, <http://www.neh.gov/about/awards/jefferson -lecture/martin-scorsese-lecture>, accessed 20 September 2016.
When the disc is spun by 'twirling' the two knots between the thumb and forefinger of each hand, persistence of vision makes the two images appear to combine and the complete picture is produced.
EXHIBITIONS Astrid Kirchherr: A Retrospective, Victoria Gallery and Museum, until January 29; Endurance: Shackleton's Antarctic Adventure, Merseyside Maritime Museum, until January 3; Drer and Italy, above, Lady Lever, until September 26; Persistence of Vision, FACT, until September 5; Beyond The Boundary, International Slavery Museum, until September 12; Arabicity: Such a Near East, The Bluecoat, until September 5; Hitched: Wedding Clothes and Costumes, Sudley House, until spring, 2011.
TheWood Street centre has launched its latest exhibition, Persistence Of Vision.
This footage was shaped into the short television him, Persistence of Vision.
Alfred Bauer, who boasted both a persistence of vision and an ability to outwit bureaucracy at its own game.
"My students were able to 'see' how complex our vision is thanks to the optical illusions and persistence of vision activities," said an eighth-grade teacher from Idaho, after utilizing the workbooks with her students.
"Zoetropes and the persistence of vision." SchoolArts, May 2004, pp.
It's a combination of the object's great speed (about 45 miles per second) and the phenomenon known as the persistence of vision, which limits our ability to detect rapid changes in brightness.
The persistence of vision, the psychophysiological phenomenon that accounts for movement in film, is here proposed as a condensed figure for our fundamental lack of presence, our inability to exist in the moment, to see what is right there in front of our eyes.
The reason we do not see the individual pictures is because of something called "Persistence of Vision." The image of each little picture remains with the eye for 1/16 of a second after it has been viewed.
Among the casualties are such long-running and award-winning series as Working TV (social justice and workers' rights show), EarthSeen (enviro T.V.), East Side Story (shot on the streets of Vancouver's east side), After Hours (activist interviews), Nitewatch (roundtable discussion and phone-in) and Persistence of Vision (local indie and underground films).