personate

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personate

(of the corollas of certain flowers) having two lips in the form of a face
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
More to the point, the personative aspect of a poem's deliverance requires not only the self's projection into a whole host of personae but also the forging of identities from a fusing, or an amalgam, of various "others." A clear example of fusion or amalgamation occurs in "A Dream or No," in the Poems of 1912-13 where, initially, "the maiden abiding" (if we are to be autobiographical about it) does not evoke Emma whose hair was com-coloured, not "brown-tressed." However, by the time we reach stanza five a setting is defined, specifically "Saint-Juliot I see" although in the earlier stages of the poem, in the second stanza, the desired beloved abides in "that place in the West." This could be anywhere on the map from Dorset to Cornwall.
Linda Shires argues that Hardy's "personative" lyric is
In the Preface to the volume Hardy also states that the poems are "in a large degree dramatic or personative in conception"; "and this even when they are not obviously so." (22) By "personative" Hardy means, on the one hand, a dramatic impersonation, as we find in dramatic monologue and lyric; but, on the other hand, he also means personal.