pestilent


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

pestilent

infected with or likely to cause epidemic or infectious disease
References in classic literature ?
House-dog , a pestilent beast kept on domestic premises to insult persons passing by and appal the hardy visitor.
This pestilent wizard (in whom his just punishment seemed to have wrought no manner of amendment) had an inveterate habit of haunting a certain mansion, styled the House of the Seven Gables, against the owner of which he pretended to hold an unsettled claim for ground-rent.
That, perhaps, in short, this Prerogative Office of the diocese of Canterbury was altogether such a pestilent job, and such a pernicious absurdity, that but for its being squeezed away in a corner of St.
Of course, there will be readers who will want to deny that queerness has anything to do with, say, the title story, which appears to be a grotesque allegory of social conformity in Cuba and the refusal to accept the pestilent death of Mama.
In A Fire in the Earth, the reader is introduced to a fair sampling of those who are pestilent and those who are victims, but most are rather two-dimensional.
Alternative theatremakers across the nation easily identified with the image of the rat: wily, indestructible, pestilent, squeezing through impossibly tight places, sneaking into the xerox room at the day job, using up all the toner, then sneaking out.
An early reviewer identified the feverish tone of its constant chatter with a female restlessness which, by implication, was the noise of pestilent unmarried women with nothing to do but talk.
As Voodoo Dreams excavates and imagines the story of Marie Laveau, we are carried from the lush, tropical bayou of Teche to the boiling, simmering, exotic, pestilent, sensuously religious life of New Orleans in the nineteenth century.
Very damaging to me, the lengths I have gone with it, like a hairy pestilent eyeball perpetually turning in on itself, examining its host without rest or pleasure, the talons operating, picking open old wounds, the scattering alarm at the touch of the wounds and the tracing to the source of the wound across space and time, canalizing, making deeper attractor basins of perpetual return.
Commenting upon the allusions to the structure and practice of the playhouse in Hamlet's 'What a piece of work is a man' speech, Cartwright takes 'foul and pestilent congregation of vapours' to be a reference to the metaphor of the theatrical illusion as 'dream' or 'shade'.
A handful of businesses, one of which is the state of Mexico, take all the wealth out of Chiapas leaving behind in exchange their mortal and pestilent track: in 1989 the financial tooth obtained a filling of 1,222,669,000,000 pesos and only left behind 616,340,000,000 in credits and works.
expel that quite unchristian worship of the human individual as such which is so rampant I mean the pestilent notion ...