Petard


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Petard

 

a charge of compacted black powder placed in a metal or cardboard casing. A petard is used in primer cups to transmit fire from the friction primer to the powder charge located in the artillery shell case. In time fuses, the petard transmits fire from the delay element to the detonator. A petard may also be used for creating sound effects in fireworks.

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In the event of the door being too strong, the petard could easily become a projectile, to the extreme discomfort of any Petardier who had not kept strictly to the drill and 'retyred' to the side in accordance with instructions.
Mettle--that you might be put on--is just an alternative to metal, meaning 'strength' or 'defensive,' but humble pie and that petard that you, like Hamlet, might be hoist with, are interesting.
Colin, of Two Gates, near Tamworth in Staffordshire, set sail with HMS Petard just two days after marrying sweetheart Olive.
In effect, Christianity is hoist with its own marketing petard.
Traditional dictionaries don't always include allusions, phrases like yellow brick road, Typhoid Mary, hoist with one's own petard, and alpha male, which are seldom easy to find.
Even if we set aside the internal inconsistencies in her use of mimesis from chapter to chapter - other theorists have, after all, been hoisted by mimesis' petard - it hardly seems likely that mimesis-as-referentiality (which seems to be her preferred understanding of the term) constitutes the mainspring of poetic representation.
With some notable exceptions--the two great commandments, the parable of the good Samaritan, for example--scriptural texts may leave even students of them hoisted on a petard of bewilderment.
But Petard had no court order to take the boy; he had a summons notifying Joseph that he had filed a complaint asking a court to recognize him as the boy's father.
Mushrooms may develop optimally when left in the dark, but any attempts to do the same to the average off-shore property owner might well result, to paraphrase the Bard, in being "hoisted on one's own petard.
It simply does not make sense for a venture such as this to be hoist by its own petard.
But if Tucker's verdict was borderline, Tendulkar was hoisted by his own petard.
Young visitors will also learn the origin of the phrase "to be hoisted by one's own petard" - which refers to a bell-shaped brass bomb called the petard which was loaded with gunpowder and placed at the door of an enemy castle.