petition

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Related to petitionary: entreaty

petition

1. a written document signed by a large number of people demanding some form of action from a government or other authority
2. Law a formal application in writing made to a court asking for some specific judicial action
References in periodicals archive ?
As further evidence of this, petitionary and ritual prayers have been associated with lower levels of mental health (Poloma & Gallup, 1991; Whittington & Scher, 2010; Winkeljohn Black, Possel, Jeppsen, Bjerg, & Wooldridge, 2015).
If the existence of Jehovah and the effectiveness of petitionary prayer were easily verifiable facts, which Sally could be blamed for failing to know, then perhaps Sally would have a moral obligation to pray to Jehovah.
Second, based on the findings of Jankowski and Sandage (2014) we hypothesized that meditative prayer would be positively associated with change in intercultural competence while petitionary prayer would exhibit nonsignificant associations.
For Muslims 'Dua' Prayer means, devotional phrases, blessings, a request made which involves petitionary prayers or thanking God or asking for forgiveness, or trying to seek comfort and support.
In Latin, this petitionary form is expressed by the use of the subjunctive mood: "per istam sanctam unctionem et suam piissimam misericordiam, indulgeat tibi etc.
Celia tries to remind her but Rosalind fails to recognize Orlando, "Nay, I prithee now with most petitionary vehemence, tell me who is it" ( III/ii,183,184); again she says , "I prithee tell me who is it quickly, and speak apace " (III/ii, 191).
In addition, brief forays are made into topics such as religious rituals, petitionary prayer, spirit possession, and ecstatic mystical encounters.
The Constitution of Romania, republished, guaranties the petitionary right in the article 51.
Unlike the petitionary writing documented by James Daybell and Lynne Magnusson, which is primarily addressed to high-ranking officials, or that of the Irish and Old English women addressed to both English and Spanish crowns I have discussed elsewhere, here we see the exploitation of extended kinship ties in suits that are carefully framed to the family patriarch, based in another country.
In an introduction to a volume I edited called Liturgy Time and the Politics of Redemption, I spoke of the particular character of petitionary prayer exemplified most dramatically by Hannah--a woman whose prayer was deemed exemplary by the rabbis.
The Dakotas' petitionary prayer reflected their status in a power-filled universe that could both help and harm.
There is an equally interesting discussion of petitionary and intercessory prayer (217-32) in the splendid chapter on prayer, whose central question is 'what is its point?