phagotroph

phagotroph

[′fag·ə‚träf]
(invertebrate zoology)
An organism that ingests nutrients by phagocytosis.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, a "price" for being a generalist relative to the specialist phagotroph is expressed by:
Such "prices" may be the extra expenses for a phagotroph invested in production of photosynthetic pigments, or the sacrifice of parts of the surface area for phagotrophic purposes in an otherwise osmotrophic organism.
when [Mathematical Expression Omitted]), and one [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 2B OMITTED] where it is predominantly a phagotroph and a predator to the bacteria (i.
How good must a mixotroph be in uptake of dissolved mineral nutrients in order to "beat" a specialized phagotroph with its assumed superior affinity for the common prey [Mathematical Expression Omitted]?
This is the case when the phagotroph incorporates only a small fraction of the mineral nutrient contained in the prey , i.
Any mineral nutrient surplus in phagotrophs is assumed to be instantly remineralized.
Bay scallops are thought to accomplish essentially all digestion extracellularly within the digestive-gland lumen (Reid, 1982); oysters, on the other hand, are considered to be phagotrophs (Galtsoff, 1964).
Chrysophycean flagellates comprise a wide range of nutritional modes, ranging from chloroplast-bearing obligate phototrophs to nonpigmented phagotrophs.
Furthermore, these trade-offs are likely to affect the competition and coexistence between mixotrophs and obligate phototrophs or phagotrophs (Rothhaupt 1996).
Competition between mixotrophic flagellates and obligate phagotrophs for mineral nutrients is analogous.
When an obligate bacterivore like Spumella is introduced, the bacteria are grazed down and the algae increase in numbers, due to the combined effects of reduced uptake by bacteria and release by the phagotrophs (Rothhaupt 1992).