phallus

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phallus

1. another word for penis
2. an image of the penis, esp as a religious symbol of reproductive power
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Phallus

 

a genus of fungi of the order Gasteromycetes. In the USSR the most widespread are P. impudicus, found in forests and brushwood on fertile soil, and P. hadriani, found in sand. The young fruiting bodies of Phallus are ovoid; later their membrane ruptures and the fruit bearer appears, consisting of a long peduncle and a conical, alveolate cap covered with greenish slime that has the unpleasant odor of carrion.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

phallus

[′fal·əs]
(anatomy)
(embryology)
An undifferentiated embryonic structure derived from the genital tubercle that differentiates into the penis in males and the clitoris in females.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(18) Certainly a potential starting point for disruption of the rigid, naturalized tautology of phallicism (masculinity = rigidity = masculinity) is active inquiry into what "natural" means, but that potential (as we see with Sartre) is wholly contingent upon how thoroughly phallicism has already corrupted one's position as a seeker of knowledge, with what rigidity one conducts one's inquiries, and finally, how rigidly one clings to the a priori.
If the sexual philosophy underlying such remarks seems quite flexible for a time of rigid sexual and gender ideologies, then we should allow our own metaphors to capture that fluidity in ways that "phallicism" cannot.
If, during the mid- to late-nineteenth century, the forces of phallicism demanded rigid roles defined by the binaries heterosexual/homosexual and masculine/feminine, then clearly here something else is allowing slippage in and among the behaviors commonly associated with those terms.
A recognition of this high degree of overlap empowers much of the commentary to date on the issue of "phallicism" and is my starting point for a discussion of more fluid forms of male behavior.
(2) See especially Irigaray for a delineation of "phallicism"'s key characteristics.
Most importantly, Eli tries to open linguistic space in the imprisoning discourse of Calibanic phallicism with his methods of black phallic tricksterism.
(10) Melville had himself discovered the pervasive phallicism of Polynesian religion.
If shared emotion so compromises phallicism, can a man survive this invasion of sentimental "weakness"?
Nothing reveals this crude, physical phallicism more than the fact that the gun, the machete, and the cudgel (for wife-beating and child beating), three over-literal extensions of an aggressive, neurotic masculinist identity, are Okonkwo's ultimate answers to any and all crises, and we see this in several incidents in the novel: the incident with the beating of his second wife during the peace week; the episode of the severe beating of his son, Nwoye, when the unhappy youth was spotted among the new community of Christian converts; and the climactic moment of the novel which results in Okonkwo's beheading of the first in the line of the advancing party of the hirelings of the colonial administration who had come to break up the village assembly at the end of the novel.