phase constant


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phase constant

[′fāz ‚kän·stənt]
(electromagnetism)
A rating for a line or medium through which a plane wave of a given frequency is being transmitted; it is the imaginary part of the propagation constant, and is the space rate of decrease of phase of a field component (or of the voltage or current) in the direction of propagation, in radians per unit length. Also known as phase-change coefficient; wavelength constant.
References in periodicals archive ?
The copper surface roughness can alter the phase constant of an EM wave, (2) changing the phase response of the circuit.
The complex wave mode implies that the phase constant and the attenuation constant of the propagation constant are both nonzero.
The slow-wave microstrip line can improve the phase constant [beta] of the electromagnetic wave conducted in the microstrip.
The phase constant [beta] can be purely real or purely imaginary depending on whether the radicand is positive or negative, respectively.
Besides, this additional resistance does neither affect the phase constant nor the characteristic impedance but only the attenuation constant (Fig.
We can calculate the phase constant of the fundamental space harmonic, only when we assume the periodic permittivity modulation applied is same as the unperturbed phase constant.
In addition, LWA support a fast wave on the guiding structure, where the phase constant [beta] is less than the free-space wave number [k.
Here h = h'-ih" is the complex propagation constant where h' is the phase constant and h" is the attenuation constant (waveguide losses).
The broadened width of the DGS microstrip line can be understood as an increased equivalent capacitance, which plays an important role in raising the phase constant and slow-wave effects.
0] + 2[pi]n/p is the propagation phase constant of the nth space harmonic; the transverse mode number [[tau].
We know that the resonance absorption occurs when a phase-matching condition is satisfied: the phase constant of an evanescent order coincides with the real part of an eigenvalue of surface plasmons.