phenylacetaldehyde

phenylacetaldehyde

[′fen·əl‚as·ə′täl·də‚hīd]
(organic chemistry)
C8H8O A colorless liquid with a boiling point of 193-194°C; soluble in ether and fixed oils; used in perfumes and flavoring. Also known as α-toluic aldehyde.
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Among the other substances in the oil of Irises were neophytadiene, eugenol, [alpha]-terpineol, germacrene D, terpinen-4-ol, hexahydrofarnesylacetone, farnesylacetone, phenylacetaldehyde, geranilasetone, 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol.
The compounds benzaldehyde, phenylacetaldehyde and ethylester L-isoleucine were present in hydrolyzed protein and treatments containing yeast extract, suggesting a possible relationship of these compounds with the attractiveness of the treatments.
Heider, "Simultaneous involvement of a tungsten-containing aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and a phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase in anaerobic phenylalanine metabolism," Journal of Bacteriology, vol.
In particular, 2-methylbutanal, 3-methylbutanal, methional, and phenylacetaldehyde arise from Strecker degradation products which occur by a transamination between [alpha]-dicarbonyl products and amino acids.
AEDA found that acetaldehyde, 2-methylpropanal, 2-methylbutanal, 3-methylbutanal, acetic, butanoic, hexanoic, octanoic, and decanoic acids, ethyl butanoate, ethyl hexanoate, dimethyl trisulfide, methional and phenylacetaldehyde had high FD values.
ALDH inhibition causes the accumulation of 3,4-dihydroxy phenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) in DA neurons, which is toxic (Burke et al.
Five aldehydes were identified among the compounds: n-hexanal, phenylacetaldehyde, n-nonanal, (E)-non-2-enal and decanal, the last three being found in all species of Aechmea analyzed.
Greenberg hypothesized that antimicrobial compounds might be produced in the gut by symbiotic microbes such as Proteus mirabilis, and, in 1986, Erdmann and Khalil identified and isolated two antibacterial substances (phenylacetic acid and phenylacetaldehyde) from the P mirabilis that they isolated from the gut of a related blowfly larva: Cochliomyia hominivorax [31].
Found amid nerve cells that spur reproductive activity in fruit flies, the protein is primarily stimulated by two aromas, phenylacetic acid and phenylacetaldehyde. Strangely, these aphrodisiacal odors are given off not by female flies, but by the fruit and plant tissues the flies eat and use for laying eggs.
Opdyke (1976) reported that three aldehydes (cinnamic aldehyde, phenylacetaldehyde and citral) were shown to be sensitizers in a human maximization test; however, essential oils that contain significant amounts of each material did not induce sensitization [25].