pea

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pea,

hardy, annual, climbing leguminous plant (Pisum sativum) of the family Leguminosae (pulsepulse,
in botany, common name for members of the Fabaceae (Leguminosae), a large plant family, called also the pea, or legume, family. Numbering about 650 genera and 17,000 species, the family is third largest, after the asters and the orchids.
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 family), grown for food by humans at least since the early Bronze Age; no longer known in the wild form. It is cultivated everywhere in home gardens and on a large scale commercially for freezing or canning. The round seed, borne in a pod, is a highly nutritious food, having a high protein and fiber content. The pod, too, of the varieties known as sugar peas, can be eaten, and the whole plant is grown for forage; the vines of garden varieties are also used for feeding stock. In New England many gardeners plant them on Apr. 19, the anniversary of the battle of Lexington—hoping to have their first peas by the Fourth of July, when according to traditional use they accompany salmon on the menu. Split peas are obtained from the field pea (var. arvense), grown also for forage and as a green manure. About three quarters of the total world crop of the field pea variety is grown in China; much is used for stock feed. It is believed that peas were long grown only for use as pea meal, dried peas, or forage. Using peas as a green table vegetable began in the late Middle Ages, and the garden varieties were developed subsequently. The garden pea is renowned as the plant with which Gregor Mendel conducted the experiments that initiated the science of genetics. The chickpeachickpea,
annual plant (Cicer arietinum) of the family Leguminosae (pulse family), cultivated since antiquity for the somewhat pealike seeds, which are often used as food and forage, principally in India and the Spanish-speaking countries.
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 and the sweet peasweet pea,
annual climbing plant (Lathyrus odoratus) of the family Leguminosae (pulse family), a legume native to S Europe but, since its introduction to horticulture c.1700, widely cultivated for its fragrant flowers.
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 belong to different genera. Peas are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Leguminosae.

pea

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(botany)
Pisum sativum. The garden pea, an annual leafy leguminous vine cultivated for its smooth or wrinkled, round edible seeds which are borne in dehiscent pods.
Any of several related or similar cultivated plants.

pea

1. an annual climbing leguminous plant, Pisum sativum, with small white flowers and long green pods containing edible green seeds: cultivated in temperate regions
2. 
a. the seed of this plant, eaten as a vegetable
b. (as modifier): #5pea soup
3. any of several other leguminous plants, such as the sweet pea, chickpea, and cowpea
References in periodicals archive ?
Phenylethylamine replacement and depletion in the treatment of depression, schizoaffective disorder, and tardive dyskenesia.
"It's a known stimulant," Vriens said, referring to phenylethylamine. "You can preserve it and then you can make 'happy' chocolates."
proposed the use of phenylethylamine and tryptamine derivatives and
Phenylacetic acid concentration in urine reflects blood levels of phenylethylamine, a hormone known to raise serotonin levels, thereby possessing an antidepressant effect.
Common food sensitivities involve the sulfites in red wine, vinegar, beer, cider and dried fruits; tyramine in aged cheese; phenylethylamine and histamine in chocolate; nitrites in hot dogs, salami and pastrami; pickled products such as pickles, olives, and sauerkraut; and monosodium glutamate (MSG), which is commonly used as a flavor enhancer in restaurants (especially Chinese) and processed foods.
According to the book Mood Foods by William Vayda, one of chocolate's amino acids, phenylethylamine, acts as a painkiller and antidepressant, which makes chocolate the "feel good food." This amino acid helps trigger the release of endorphins, which provide a sense of well-being.
Examples of food intolerances include reactions- to monosodium glutamate (MSG), tyramine in cheese, caffeine in coffee, sulfites in wine, phenylethylamine in chocolate, or milk and its products in the case of someone who has a genetic lactase deficiency.
* Reactions to substances naturally in some foods, such as tyramine in cheese, phenylethylamine in chocolate, caffeine in coffee, and some compounds in alcoholic beverages.
"It has phenylethylamine, thought to elevate mood and support energy.
Dark chocolate increases serotonin and dopamine levels in the brain, making us happy and then puts us in the "mood".Chocolate also contains phenylethylamine - a compound that we have been shown to produce when we are in love.
There is a natural nutrient called PEA (phenylethylamine) in apples that contributes to a feeling of well-being.
Chocolate is a mood booster as it contains phenylethylamine (PEA), which is a chemical the brain releases when one falls in love.