phenylpropane

phenylpropane

[¦fen·əl′prō‚pān]
(organic chemistry)
References in periodicals archive ?
With a hyperbranched macromolecular structure, lignin is composed of three different phenylpropane units: p-coumaryl alcohol, coniferyl alcohol, and sinapyl alcohol and contains various functional groups, like hydroxyl, carboxyl acid, methoxyl, ether, and ester groups [11].
(2007) assumed that large fragments have a better chance to contribute to polymerization because of the presence of a larger number of phenylpropane units.
Lignin is an amorphous, three-dimensional, highly branched polyphenolic substance consisting of an irregular array of hydroxy-/methoxy-substituted phenylpropane units supported by [beta]-O-4, [alpha]-O-4, 5-5, [beta]-5, and [beta]-[beta] linkages [3, 7, 8].
Allium tuberosum Rottler has two new phenylpropane glycosides and four known flavonoids (kaempferol 3-O-[beta]-sophoroside; 3-O-[beta]-D-(2-Oferuloyl)-glucosyl-7,4-di-O-[beta]-D-glucosyl- kaempferol; 3-O-[beta]-sophorosyl-7-O-[beta]-D-(2-O-feruloyl) glucosyl-kaempferol; and kaempferol 3,4'-di-O-[beta]-D-glucoside) [44].
Lignin is an amorphous polymer consisting of phenylpropane units [10].
Lignin absorbs UV light with high molar extinction coefficients because of the several methoxylated phenylpropane units of which they are composed [29].
The chemical structure of lignin is irregular because the different structural units (e.g., phenylpropane units) are not linked to each other in any systematic order.
Lignin is a highly branched polymer composed of phenylpropane units organized in a complex three-dimensional structure.
It is a complex polymer consisting of cross linked phenylpropane units which contains large numbers of various types of ether linkages and free phenol groups.