philopatry


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philopatry

[‚fī·lə′pa·trē]
(ecology)
A dispersal method in which reproductive particles remain near their point of origin.
(psychology)
The drive to stay on or near the site of birth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cooke, "Winter philopatry in migratory waterfowl," The Auk, vol.
Evidence of philopatry in sharks and implications for the management of shark fisheries.
Regardless of species, recaptures occurred in low numbers compared to the number of marked individuals (Table 1), indicating that there is no philopatry in the population of Carollia with respect to P.
This situation provides a greater opportunity for admixture across breeding locales, which would likely homogenize the nuclear genome even in the presence of female philopatry. The observed mtDNA differentiation was largely due to the presence of two divergent clades: (A) a clade showing signs of admixture among all breeding locales and (B) a clade primarily composed of YKD samples.
Philopatry to stopover site and body condition of transient Reed Warblers during autumn migration through Israel.
Amphibian populations may easily become isolated within a fragmented landscape because amphibians have low agility, high philopatry, and often find the matrix environment inhospitable [10].
The emigration and immigration of these birds between the various colonies still needs to be determined, including the degree of philopatry. This operation could also be a way to explain these demographic trends.
First, they tend to nest where they emerge as adults (termed "philopatry," see Cane 1997), even after they have been moved prior to emerging, provided that they have the requisite materials in which to nest, as demonstrated in this study.
Among mammals, natal dispersal among males and philopatry (site fidelity to the natal home range) among females is the predominant pattern (Greenwood, 1980; Waser and Jones, 1983; Handley and Perrin, 2007).