phonograph cartridge

phonograph cartridge

[′fō·nə‚graf ‚kär·trij]
(engineering acoustics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recording and playback equipment: Substrate-borne vibrations and video were recorded with a phonograph cartridge (Model 91T, Astatic, Solon, OH) and a custom-made amplifier, connected to a digital video camera (Model PV - DV400D, Panasonic, Secaucus, NJ).
The signals were recorded by the phonograph cartridge placed 10 cm from the female.
The phonograph cartridge was placed 15 cm away from the female, and her legs were touched with a paintbrush until she emitted the disturbance signal.
Lilla, Brazil's largest coffee equipment manufacturer, established itself in 1918, a year that is marked with other innovations such as the stainless steel thermos bottle and the phonograph cartridge. But, oddly enough, Lilla can attribute its creation to an event, which unfortunately, that year is better known for ...
First, it must boost the output of the small signal generated by the phonograph cartridge to a level sufficient to be properly utilized by the system preamplifier.
A phonographic tone arm, with the needle of the phonograph cartridge acting as an electromagnetic transducer, was placed on the Sawbones adjacent to the outer shell and the impact signal transmitted to a laptop computer through a preamplifier--a technique previously used to measure impacts in the femur.
What's going on here: The $ensible Sound reviewing a phonograph cartridge retailing for more than a thousand dollars?
Arguably the most accurate phonograph cartridge made at any price, and the one that will treat your vinyl with the most tender loving care.
Cage's Cartridge Music (1960), which amplifies various objects with phonograph cartridges, follows; while not expressly associated with computers, its presence is a nod to machine-made indeterminacy, illustrating Schmidt's assertion that "randomness (decision avoiding, or more concisely, leaving a decision to chance within an exactly specified range of possibilities) is one of the most important tools of the computer composer." As it happens, Cage spent time with Hiller in 1967 during a stint as a visiting research professor at Illinois, and the two had already begun work on their pioneering collaboration utilizing computers, HPSCHD (1967-69).
For recording signals there are laser vibrometers, accelerometers, phonograph cartridges (record needles), and paper-thin piezo-electric strips.