phonophobia


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phonophobia

[′fō·nə′fō·bē·ə]
(psychology)
An abnormal fear of sound.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hemicrania continua is a syndrome of continual pain on one side of the head, associated with ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms and migrainous features like photophobia or phonophobia. It is highly responsive to indomethacin.
Vomiting, nausea, photophobia, phonophobia, and vertigo were leading symptom associated with CDH; whereas light, fast, and stress were leading precipitating factors associated with CDH.
Records were excluded for studies reporting misophonia, phonophobia, and loudness recruitment.
As defined by IHS, migraine is commonly unilateral, pulsating and moderate to severe in intensity and is associated with nausea and photophobia and phonophobia. TTH is characterised as bilateral, pressing/tightening in quality, mild or moderate in intensity and is usually not aggravated by routine physical activities.
They describe tinnitus and hyperacusis in literature, film, and music; the mechanism and time course of tinnitus associated with hearing impairment; animal models; psychological mechanisms; tinnitus in military and veteran populations; drug-induced tinnitus; somatic modulation; the influence of amplified music; middle ear myoclonus and tonic tensor tympani syndrome; pulsatile tinnitus; acoustic shock; hearing aids for tinnitus; cochlear implants and tinnitus; self-help interventions; misophonia and phonophobia; musical hallucinations; managing tinnitus in childhood and adults; and emerging approaches to treatment.
Migraine typically causes pulsating pain in a localized area of the head that lasts as long as 72 hours and can be associated with nausea, vomiting, photophobia, phonophobia, and aura.
neoformans infections such as fever, headache, photophobia, phonophobia, cough, and altered mental status including personality changes.
The third phase involves asking about the history of headache attacks, such as location, frequency, length, and accompanying features, including photophobia, phonophobia, nausea, vomiting, and autonomic symptoms.
Migraine commonly presents as a unilateral (60%), pulsatile (85%) headache which is usually associated with nausea (90%), vomiting (30%), photophobia and phonophobia (80%), and fatigue.
At present, it is difficult to clinically distinguish migraine from TTH, as the International Headache Society's main definition of TTH allows an admixture of nausea, photophobia, or phonophobia in various combinations, although the appendix definition does not.
With International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition (ICHD-III) criteria, migraines can be differentiated from acute, acute recurrent, and chronic progressive or chronic nonprogressive headaches if a child has experienced at least five attacks lasting up to 72 hours (whether untreated or unsuccessfully treated), if nausea and/or vomiting or photophobia and phonophobia are present, and if the child has at least two of four characteristics, including unilateral location, pulsating quality, moderate to severe intensity, and a tendency to be aggravated by--or avoid--routine physical activity.