lecithin

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Related to phosphatidylcholine: Phosphatidylethanolamine

lecithin

Biochem any of a group of phospholipids that are found in many plant and animal tissues, esp egg yolk: used in making candles, cosmetics, and inks, and as an emulsifier and stabilizer in foods (E322)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

lecithin

[′les·ə·thən]
(biochemistry)
Any of a group of phospholipids having the general composition CH2OR1·CHOR2·CH2OPO2OHR3, in which R1 and R2 are fatty acids and R3 is choline, and with emulsifying, wetting, and antioxidant properties.
(materials)
A mixture of phosphatides and oil obtained by drying the separate gums from the degumming of soybean oil; consists of the phosphatides (lecithin), cephalin, other fatlike phosphorus-containing compounds, and 30-35% entrained soybean oil; may be treated to produce more refined grades; used in foods, cosmetics, and paints. Also known as commercial lecithin; crude lecithin; soybean lecithin; soy lecithin.
A waxy mixture of phosphatides obtained by refining commercial lecithin to remove the soybean oil and other materials; used in pharmaceuticals. Also known as refined lecithin.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lecithin

A liquid, obtained in refinement of soya beans or cottonseed; used in paints to promote pigment wetting and to control pigment settling and flow properties.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Injection lipolysis with a cocktail of phosphatidylcholine and deoxycholate: an Indian experience.
Becker, "Phosphatidylcholine affects inner membrane protein translocases of mitochondria," The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol.
Jackowski, "Phosphatidylcholine and the CDP-choline cycle," Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA)--Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, vol.
However, these studies did not analyse other classes of metabolites, such as phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins which play an important role in membrane function [25], activation of enzymes, and cellular signal transduction [26].
Sugihara et al., "PIEZO1 gene mutation in a Japanese family with hereditary high phosphatidylcholine hemolytic anemia and hemochromatosis-induced diabetes mellitus," International Journal of Hematology, vol.
He found that the brome mosaic virus stimulates synthesis of host lipid cells called phosphatidylcholine at the sites where viral replication occurs, and that by inhibiting its synthesis, the viral replication stopped.
Choline is used for Phosphatidylcholine synthesis, a major Phospholipid required for cell maintenance and replication.
Stent implantation in experimental animals caused more severe injury than coronary artery balloon angioplasty and led to increased expression of C-reactive protein and oxidized phosphatidylcholine in the neointima [33].
Two adjuvants were added to each of the six products: polydimethylsiloxane (Vertex RS[R]) at a dosage of 20ml of the product per 100L of water and phosphatidylcholine plus propionic acid (LI700[R], formulation emulsifiable concentrate--EC), at a dosage of 500ml of product per 100 liters of water; plant protection products with water was used as a control.
Lipid Therapeutics has entered into a licensing agreement with Nestle Health Science for exclusive rights to Lipid Therapeutics' LT-02 compound (phosphatidylcholine), a novel barrier function therapy for patients with mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis (UC), worldwide excluding Europe and Australia.
Phosphatidylcholine (also known as lecithin), choline, betaine, and L-carnitine, which are abundant in both red meat and dairy products, participate in intestinal microorganism metabolism and are converted to trimethylamine (TMA).

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