phosphatization


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phosphatization

[‚fäs·fəd·ə′zā·shən]
(geochemistry)
Conversion to a phosphate or phosphates; for example, the diagenetic replacement of limestone, mudstone, or shale by phosphate-bearing solutions, producing phosphates of calcium, aluminum, or iron.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Phosphatization of organic matter requires an alkaline and reducing (micro-) environment (Briggs & Kear 1993).
(1994), is also interpreted here as being formed post mortem as a result of phosphatization of the original structure of the organic matter in the shell.
Phosphatization is a chemical treatment, in aqueous phase, of a metal surface.
Zinc phosphatization is well-known for the interlocking of paint coatings on automotive steel sheets.
We have examined this specimen using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyses with the intention of testing the suspected preservation of the digestive system by phosphatization (see Lerosey-Aubril et al.
The remaining surface treatments, grit blasting plus primer and phosphatization with or without primer, provide intermediate levels of durability.
The phosphatization was performed in a nine-step Bonder 28 Zn/Ni-phosphatizing process with Zirconium fluoride as passivation.
The secondary phosphatic matter seems to have been formed via decay and phosphatization of primary shell organic matter (by analogy to the scheme described in Briggs & Kear 1993), during which particles of the surrounding quartzose sand/silt penetrated into shell space and cemented.
Excellent preservation of protoconodonts and paraconodonts in many localities was probably a result of their secondary phosphatization, which became very common in that period of time.
2008), these nanofibrils have been interpreted as biopolymer strands preserved by immediate post-mortem phosphatization of organic tissues (Lang et al.
Condensation and phosphatization of the Middle and Upper Ordovician limestones on the Malopolska Block (Poland): response to paleoceanographic conditions.

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