phospholipase D


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phospholipase D

[‚fäs·fə′lī‚pās ′dē]
(biochemistry)
An enzyme found in almost all mammalian cells that hydrolyzes phosphatidylcholine to produce the signaling molecule phosphatidic acid, which acts on many regulatory enzymes and other proteins in the cell. Abbreviated PLD.
References in periodicals archive ?
DAG, diacylglycerol; DGK, diacylglycerol kinase; PLD, phospholipase D.
Choline is an indicator of phospholipase D activity, which also generates potent platelet activators such as phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid.
The difference between WBCHO and PLCHO concentrations are explained by several mechanisms: intracellular generation of choline in blood cells by intracellularly located phospholipase D and cell activation pathways (3-7), existence of a choline transport system in blood cells (10), and the fact that choline is removed to a certain extent from plasma via cellular uptake by other tissues (11).
Activation of phospholipase D in human platelets by collagen and thrombin and its relationship to platelet aggregation.