photomechanical


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photomechanical

[¦fōd·ō·mi′kan·ə·kəl]
(graphic arts)
Pertaining to any platemaking process in which photographic negatives and positives are exposed onto plates or cylinders that have been coated with photosensitive substances.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unless otherwise noted, 'reproduction' refers to a print made via a photomechanical process.
Multiple prints would be almost impossible to achieve until photomechanical methods were employed.
Sophia had ceased copying paintings by the 1850s, when photomechanical methods of reproduction were becoming more widely and enthusiastically used, and one possible application of daguerreotype, the reproduction of literary manuscripts, had been broached in Littles Living Age in 1854 (Williams 163), a year after Herman Melville published Bartleby, the Scrivener, a fictional account of the soul-deadening effects of mechanical copying when that is performed by a human being.
Despite his enthusiasm for the artists' interpretive draftsmanship, however, Pennell was hostile to the wood engravers who cut their designs and therefore celebrated the new photomechanical processes that emancipated the artist (he claimed) from the translations of the engraver.
Originally published in 1935, this photomechanical reprint of "Boats, Airplanes & Kites" by Armand J.
We have been brought up to read text but paradoxically the visual aspect in general has been neglected despite the enormous progress in photomechanical reproduction.
UCR was still possible to be used in photomechanical operations as a separate mask made, but also was implemented as a hardware function in older analogue scanners.
water-borne deposits and soliflucted sediments), it is likely that exposure to temperature changes, thermal stresses, desiccation, photochemical and photomechanical processes, and other atmospheric processes was limited.
Other entries describe the photomechanical and negative processes employed in the 19th century, as well as technical matters and discussion of equipment such as darkrooms, lenses, and cameras.
That author and editor worked together to improve the reproductions suggests that the previous high contrast in the images had more to do with the limitations of photomechanical reproduction twenty-five years ago than with the photographer's aesthetic or philosophical choice.
Thrown up for contemplation thereafter in photomechanical shadow play, time and again, is the very fact of textual defacement given a faceless shape in process.
Prior to the introduction of photomechanical half-tone printing, photographs could not be printed in ink; they had to be exposed on photographic paper and laid in by hand, usually interleaved sparsely between pages of text.