photon theory

photon theory

[′fō‚tän ‚thē·ə·rē]
(quantum mechanics)
A theory of photoemission developed by Einstein, according to which a light beam behaves like a stream of particles (called photons) when it delivers energy to a substance displaying photoemission, the particles each having an energy equal to Planck's constant times the frequency of the light.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A beam-split coincidence test with [gamma]-rays is fair to both the loading theory and photon theory. The loading theory takes h as a maximum.
An apparent failure of the photon theory of scattering.
This is Albert Einstein talking; the man who won the Nobel Prize in physics, the man who investigated the thermal properties of light that led to the photon theory of light, and the man who articulated the principle of relativity.