photopigment


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photopigment

[¦fōd·ō¦pig·mənt]
(biochemistry)
A pigment that is unstable in the presence of light of appropriate wavelengths, such as the chromophore pigment which combines with opsins to form rhodopsin in the rods and cones of the vertebrate eye.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vertebrate and spider peropsins are bistable photopigments that, in the dark, bind all-trans retinal, which is converted to 11-cis retinal by light (Nagata et al.
Taking a study from last year as their base, Hart and his colleagues isolated and sequenced genes encoding shark photopigments involved in vision.
Color Vision: From Genes to Perception, chapter Opsin genes, cone photopigments, color vision, and color blindness, pages 3-51.
However, he adds, even as activating melanopsin photopigment during the day is believed to be beneficial, it could be bad to activate it at night.
Phytoplankton photopigments as indicators of estuarine and coastal eutrophication.
2]) represents a substantial substrate on which to incorporate photopigment molecules.
The parameters showing the largest effects of bright light exposure were clearly the ratios of the long wave-length to short wavelength photopigment weighting factors that are indicative of the relative value of the two photopigments to the composite curve.
The compound only works when the rods and cones of the retinal photopigment layer have already died, as this causes electrophysiological changes in to the ganglion cells.
A recently discovered photopigment, melanopsin, has been localized in the retinas of both rodents and humans (Provencio et al.
The functional relevance of opsin coexpression in extraocular tissues is unclear, but it is thought that a single photopigment could detect irradiance, whereas multiple photopigments with different spectral sensitivities and located in different photoreceptor cells could reliably photoentrain circadian rhythms to dawn and dusk via wavelength discrimination (Roenneberg and Foster, 1997; Bertolucci and Foa, 2004).
8) Tetartan designs were included to identify abnormality of a supposed fourth yellow sensitive photopigment but are not needed.
Further analysis showed that retinal photoreceptor cells in the mouse model were most likely dying as a result of a toxic accumulation of the very photopigment, which receives light signals in the eye and is crucial for normal vision.